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Category Archives: Indigenous Studies

Rangahau Roundup

Semester 2 has been busy on the research front for Te Tumu staff and postgrads.

Te Tumu is still progressing with Te Kōparapara, a book on Māori culture, history and contemporary society, which is designed as a textbook for MAOR102 as well as for a general audience.  Prof Michael Reilly is the main driver of this project, and has been ably assisted by Dr Gianna Leoni.  This book, with an array of essays mainly written by Te Tumu staff, is under contract with Auckland University Press and should appear sometime in 2017.

Faculty News

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Associate Prof Jenny Bryant-Tokalau has been having a busy Research and Study Leave.  She has given two presentations in the USA in the last semester:  ‘Food security and other risks in a time of climate change: traditional and contemporary forms of resilience’, to the Department of Anthropology, and ‘Small Island Pacific States: Dealing with Climate Change’ to the Department of Geology at Wheaton College in Massachusetts.  In December she presented ‘Working in Context: The Commercial Potential of Customary Pacific Land’ at the  Aotearoa New Zealand International Development Studies Network Ninth Biennial Conference ‘Pacific Currents, Global Tides’ Wellington, and ‘Dealing with disasters and social change’ to the Asia Pacific Biocultural Health ‘Big Ideas’ Workshop, in Dunedin, December.

Jenny has also had one chapter in an edited collection appear during this period: ‘Community responses to floods in Fiji: lessons learned’ In Calabrese, John (ed.) Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response: Rising to the Challenge. MAP Series, Middle East Institute, Washington. August (2016) issue. Click here to access it.  She also has two book reviews published in New Zealand and Pacific Studies November, 2016; and Journal of the Polynesian Society 125 (1), 2016.

Jenny is planning to return to the Solomon Islands to carry out in-depth interviews on small and medium businesses on Kastom land, as well as to finalise book edits for Palgrave MacMillan Anthropology of Disaster Series: What the Pacific Islands can teach New Zealand about Climate Change.

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Paul Tapsell, Merata Kawharu and Hirini Tane. (Click on pictures to see full size)

As previous posted, Prof Paul Tapsell spoke at the Indigenous Plenary at the WAC-8 Conference in September.   Paul and Associate Prof Merata Kawharu are also part of the large three-year Mauri-Whenua-Ora project within the National Science Challenge Land and Water: Toitū te Whenua, Toiora te Wai.  This project is the only fully Māori-led and Māori-integrated research programmes of all NSCs nationally, and is looking at Maori land and water based innovation including: (1) micro economy development “Pa to Plate”, (2) Shared iwi innovation for Taitokerau as a model for other iwi and (3) a regional (Te Hiku) study looking at Maori land suitable use and value chains.  Merata also has a forthcoming publication, “Indigenous Entrepreneurship: Cultural Coding and the Transformation of Ngāti Whātua in New Zealand” in the Journal of the Polynesian Society, 125, 4 (2016): 385-408.

 

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Associate Prof Lachy Paterson gave a presentation entitled ‘U.S. Slave “Humor” in New Zealand Newspapers’ at the 109th Annual Meeting of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association at Waikoloa, Hawai’i. He is currently writing up this paper, which looked at how imported racist discourses permeated New Zealand’s English-language newspapers.  Lachy returned to his ongoing obsession with Māori-language newspapers, with “The New Zealand Government’s Niupepa and their Demise” published in the New Zealand Journal of History, 50, 2 (2016): 44-67.

Together with Associate Prof Angela Wanhalla (Dept of History and Art History), he has also sent off their manuscript “He Reo Wahine: Māori Women’s Voices from the Nineteenth Century” to Auckland University Press, and it should appear sometime in 2017.

 

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Over summer Prof Michael Reilly hopes to write a paper concerning the research relationship between William Wyatt Gill of the London Missionary Society, and Mamae of Ngāti Vara, a church minister, on Mangaia during the 19th century.  In the longer run, he wants to begin writing chapters for an introduction to Māori tribal history, drawing from the draft text used as a ‘course reader’ in MAOR 207 Ngā Kōrero Nehe – Tribal Histories.  Michael is passionate about this project but acknowledges that it may take several years to finish.  He has also completed the final editorial corrections for a paper to be published this December, “Narrative Features and Cultural Motifs in a Cautionary Tradition from Mangaia (Cook Islands)”, in the Journal of the Polynesian Society 125, 4 (2016): 357-384.

 

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Dr Jim Williams has a forthcoming article in the Journal of the Polynesian Society, entitled “Seafood Gardens”.  Jim has a busy summer planned, fininishing off an essay for Ethnohistory, entitled “Layers of History” explaining how certain activities are repeated at powerful places, giving rise to notions of circularity of time, but layered, like whakapapa;  he will also be giving a presentation in January at the American Historical Association conference in Denver.  One of Jim’s students, Katrina Bryant, has just completed her Master of Physiotherapy.

 

In October newly graduated Dr Gianna Leoni gained a new position based in Te Tumu, that of a Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga postdoctoral fellow, with the research project “Te Ōhanga o te Pīpīwharauroa – Expressing our Economic Aspirations”. Click here for more details.

 

otago083301In June, Megan Pōtiki presented on her doctoral research on language loss at Ōtākou, at He Rau Tumu Kōrero IX at Te Rau Aroha Marae in Bluff.  This event was run by Te Pouhere Kōrero, the national Māori historians organisation.  Megan has also published two journal articles, “The Otago Peninsula: A unique identity” in Shima, 10, 1 (2016): 67-84 [Potiki-Shima-v10n1-3]; and ‘Te Haka Nā Ngā Herehere’ in Te Pouhere Kōrero 8 (2016): 6 –25, and is currently working on another article, “Māori song composition and reclamation of traditional tribal borders” based on a mōteatea she composed for the Te Tumu Kapa Haka group.

 

As part of Māori language week this year Tangiwai Rewi was asked to give a  Library research floor talk on Wednesday 13 July on the Ngāruawāhia Turangawaewae regatta, which comes out of her doctoral research and an article last year in the Journal of the Polynesian Society.  A display themed around the article was shown in the Hocken Collections for seven weeks as part of Māori language Week.  Click here for more details and pictures.

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Children learning about NZ moths.

Tangiwai has participated in the Ahi Pepe Resource launch 27 October and Wānanga 26-28 October.  She was a collaborator in this project which created an immersion te reo Māori Moths resource depicting the 600+ species endemic to the South Island.   Twelve schools were invited to the Wānanga, to participate, learn how to trap, kill and present moths for identification and preservation.  Also launched that night were  the bilingual and total immersion resource covering the four areas of the South Island.

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Tangiwai Rewi (R, standing)

Tangiwai  also attended the SCANZ (Science Communicators Association NZ) conference on 14 November as part of the panel who discussed the resource and preservation of moths.

Tangiwai went north to attend the Te Awamārahi poukai on 24 November.  (Poukai are ceremonial gatherings held on Kīngitanga marae.)  This was an opportunity to take the photo display back to her marae especially as some of people featured in the photos  come from that marae.  The photo boards were put on display along with other harakeke resources found along the riverbanks. Needless to say, Tangiwai also vigorously promoted Te Tumu and the University of Otago to all the people who came to view the display.

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Display on Ngāruawāhia Regatta at Te Awamārahi Marae, Waikato

Postgraduate News

Congratulations to Matangi Schaaf who graduates in December with a PhD; and also to Nikki Walden (Taranaki, Te Āti Awa) and Nurul Sultan with Master of Indigenous Studies degrees.  Click here for more details.

 

Two of our PhD students are submitting in December: John Birnie and Taomi Qiliho-Tapu, and Tāwini White (Ngāi Tahu, Te Rarawa) is making the final amendments to her MA thesis.  Rieko Hayakawa‘s PhD thesis ‘Possibility of Telecommunication Universal Service in the Pacific Islands; Case studies of Vanuatu, PEACESAT and USPNet’ has just passed examination.  We look forward to these students graduating in the near future.

 

We have a new PhD student who has just started, Raaniera Te Whata (Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Porou, te Whānau a Apanui), researching communities-based Māori land development in the Bay of Islands.  Raaniera comes into doctoral studies after completing an LLB in Auckland and a Master of Indigenous Studies in Te Tumu.

 

In August Erica Newman who is undertaking PhD research on Fijian Orphanages (1874-1970) presented at the Anthropology and Archaeology Postgraduate Symposium held here in Dunedin.

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Matiu Payne (Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Mutunga), who is researching the impact of government agencies on tikanga whāngai for his doctoral studies, has just been to the Australia New Zealand Law and History Society conference at Curtin University in Perth presenting on his PhD research.

 

Kelli Te Maihāroa (Waitaha) who is researching Māori peace traditions and their relevance to whānau today, has co-edited an edited collection: H. Devere, K. Te Maihāroa, & J.P. Synott (eds.) Peacebuilding and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Experiences and Strategies for the 21st Century, (Springer: Cham, Switzerland, 2016), which includes two co-written and one sole-authored articles by Kelli.  She also has an article forthcoming, “Whanaungatanga: Relationships in a One Day Te Reo Māori School of Excellence” in  Theobald, M. (Ed.)  Friendships in Multilingual Settings (Sociological Studies of Children and Youth, Vol 21 (2016)).  Emerald.  Kelli, who is a lecturer in the College of Education, also presented at the Teacher Education Forum of Aotearoa New Zealand, in June/July in Dunedin, and at International Indigenous Research Conference in November in Auckland.

 

 

 

Postgraduates Graduating

Te Tumu congratulates our postgraduate students who are graduating this December.

Doctor of Philosophy

Matani Fakatotua Schaaf

Supervisors: Dr. Paerau Warbrick, Prof. Michael Reilly (until 2012, Prof. Brendan Hokowhitu)

2016 Kupe Matani Schaaf DUNEDIN

Matani Schaaf and Minister of Education, Hekia Parata.

Title: Motivation and Burnout in Professional Pasifiki Rugby Players

This thesis examined the participation motivation among professional Pasifiki rugby players. Dominated by Western theories and models, rugby participation research has overlooked the inclusion of a theory or model that is significant to Pasifiki peoples. This research identified what cultural factors exist, that motivate so many Pasifiki peoples to play rugby.  This research also highlighted a mismatch between the lived realities of Pasifiki rugby players’ experiences of motivation and burnout, compared to the lived realities of Palāngi rugby players. The most notable outcome, was that Pasifiki rugby players’ experiences were dramatically intensified, by familial, cultural, spiritual and financial obligations; which manifested in burnout, mental illness, substance abuse, binge drinking and failed attempts at suicide.

Master of Indigenous Studies

Te Tumu also has two Master of Indigenous Studies (MIndS) students graduating.

Nurul Sultan, supervised by Dr Lyn Carter, researched “The Relevance of Indigenous Knowledge in Contemporary Research Methodologies”.

Nikki Walden (Taranaki, Te Āti Awa), supervised by Assoc Prof. Merata Kawharu, undertook her MIndS research on “Āhurutanga: the practice and application of a customary Māori principle within a Māori tertiary context.  Mā te whakaharatau e tika ai.”

University of Winnipeg student’s blogpost on Otago

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Anna Huard and pupils from te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ōtepoti.

Dunedin might be at the “bottom of the world” but we still have people prepared to make their way down here.  One such person was Anna Huard, a second-year student in the University of Winnipeg’s MDP (Master’s in Development Practice) programme.  While here Anna spent time at Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ōtepoti, and with people from Te Tumu.  Click here to read about her experiences at Otago from the “University of Winnipeg’s MDP students blogging from the field” site.

 

 

He rongo

Aroha mai! A belated roundup of Te Tumu research news.

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Professor Poia Rewi

In July we were treated to Poia Rewi’s Inaugural Professorial Lecture, held to celebrate his ascension to this tūranga rangatira within the university.  The title of his talk was “Hoka : Motivators of Time”, a tour alongside Poia as he recounted his own academic journey, and his ZePA model of developing positivity around the use of te reo Māori. This was well attended by Poia’s whānau, staff and students, as well as many from the community, and was capped off with haka, waiata and karakia. The lecture can now be viewed on ITunes U.

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Sandra Spence

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Dr Gianna Leoni

In July Te Tumu were privileged to host Professor Michael Harkin as a William Evans Fellow. Professor Harkin, a cultural anthropologist and inaugural editor of Ethnohistory, gave several talks: a public lecture “The Trump at the End of the World: Monsters and Marvels in our Parlous Age”, in which he brought his knowledge of societies past and present together, and a departmental seminar, “‘The Emotional Archive’: The case of Residential Schools in Canada”, in which he examined ‘the relative lack of negative narratives [he] elicited…during fieldwork in British Columbia in the 1980s–2000s’, while also exploring ‘various forms of social memory, proposing the notion of an “emotional archive” that contains non-narrative memory traces’.

It is always great when our students gain their postgraduate degrees, after months or years of working on, and writing up their research. We had three such students graduating this August: Sandra Spence (Pākehā) and Raaniera Te Whata (Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Porou, Te Whānau a Apanui, Airihi) with the Master of Indigenous Studies, and Gianna Leoni (Ngāti Kurī, Ngāti Takoto, Itariana) with a PhD.

Dr Lyn Carter supervised Sandra, whose research was on “Kāi Tahu Chinese Unions and Identity in Otago and Southland/Murihiku”; Associate Professor Merata Kāwharu supervised Rāniera (“Tautoro, tū te ao, tū te pō (The endurance of Tautoro heritage): Investigating challenges and opportunities”); Professor Poia Rewi and Associate Professor Lachy Paterson supervised Gianna (“Mā te Taki te Kāhui Ka Tau: Te Waiaro ki te Reo Māori i ngā Hinonga Kāwanatanga”) who wrote her thesis in te reo Māori.  Gianna is teaching MAOR312: Te Māhuri 2 this semster.

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The abstract of Gianna’s PhD. Click to enlarge.

 

Congratulations to Nathan Matthews

He mihi nunui ki a Nathan Matthews, e piki haere ana ki te ara mātauranga.  Congratulations to Nathan Matthews in his new role at Te Whare Wānanga o Awananuiārangi.  Nathan completed his undergraduate and postgraduate studies in Māori Studies in Te Tumu, completing his PhD in 2006.  He also taught te reo Māori and Māori performing arts in Te Tumu for a number of years.  In 2009 Nathan moved to Massey University to take up the role of Māori doctoral studies coordinator, later shifting to Whangārei as the founding principal of Te Kura Hourua O Whangarei Terenga Paraoa, a partnership secondary school.  It’s great to hear that our former colleague and alumni of Te Tumu is heading back to the tertiary sector as Head of the School of Indigenous Graduate Studies at Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi.

 

Graduating this week

Lois KusilifuCongratulations to Lois Kusilifu (Solomon Islands) who is graduating this week with a Master of Indigenous Studies degree.

Title:   The Experiences of the Solomon Islands Seasonal Workers under the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme in New Zealand

Supervisor: Dr.Alumita Durutalo

Abstract“Oketa chalens na osem, pipol lo dea oketa laef stael differen, espeseli na swea. Ani smol samting swea.Iumi wea garem kastom,kaen ia barava nogud lo iumi. Sapos iu no doim eniting gud oketa swea lo iu nao, so hem na osem mi faesim. Hem nogud tumas lo mi taem mi herem oketa usim nem blo God mi fil nogud tumas. Nara samting moa,mifala waka anda nit presa. Mifala bae no rest, taem,taem, everiting mas in taem. Osem gogo mifala big woman gogo osem smol pikinini tu becos mifala waka anda presa. Ma samting mi saenem na ia. Osem sapos oketa lelebet meanim wei blo iumi bae gud(9WW).”

(The challenges I have come across is that the lifestyle is different. Especially the way swearing and blasphemy are a common everyday speech. Not only that, we work under pressure. We don’t rest for long. We are expected to do things on time. This makes us feel as if we are kids. If only they understood us)

This study focuses on e focus the experiences of the Solomon Islands seasonal migrant workers in New Zealand’s Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) scheme. This scheme enables low-skilled seasonal migrant workers, to work temporarily in New Zealand’s horticulture and viticulture industries for a period of three to seven months each year. Interviews were conducted in two different locations- Wairarapa, New Zealand and Honiara- Solomon Islands. Qualitative research methods were used in gathering primary and secondary information. The findings of the research suggest that Solomon Islanders have benefited from participating in the scheme in ways they expressed as in building of permanent homes, advanced payment of school fees and undertaking of small businesses.

This study focused on extending the boundaries of earlier research, such as that done on Ni-Vanuatu seasonal workers in New Zealand, by having an in-depth focus on the social experiences of the Solomon Islands seasonal workers in New Zealand. What were the social experiences of the Solomon Islands seasonal workers and what could be done to improve employer and employee relations through policies to enable the benefit of all, the employers, employees and the countries involved.

Te Tumu Research Roundup

Te Tumu staff have been active with research in the first half of the year.   The highlights (listed below) show the depth and diversity of the research undertaken at the School.

In April Te Tumu hosted a three-day conference, Te Kura Roa: Minority Language & Dialect Conference, that attracted a number of speakers, from within New Zealand, as well as from USA, Tahiti, Australia, Scotland and Israel.  Poia Rewi was the driving force behind this conference, a collaboration between the University of Otago, Victoria University and Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga.  Suzanne Duncan was the key organiser, ably assisted by a number of students.

In May Te Tumu celebrated its 25th Anniversary, in conjunction with the Māori Centre’s anniversary.  Events were organised by a committee headed by Karyn Paringatai and Suzanne Duncan.  Of particular note was a one-day symposium at which a number of Te Tumu alumni presented on where their university educations had taken them.

In July, the book “The Lives of Colonial Objects” was published by Otago University Press, comprising a number of short essays on particular objects.  Four Te Tumu staff contributed chapters: Megan Pōtiki on a tokotoko held by her whānau; Paerau Warbrick on a Māori Land Court Minute Book; Pāora Tapsell on the Te Haupapa cannon at Maketū; and Lachy Paterson on a press used to print a Māori-language newspaper in the 1860s.  Also in this volume is a chapter by Michael Stevens, a former Te Tumu post-doc, on his whānau’s kahukiwi.

Pāora Tapsell, Poia Rewi and Tangiwai Rewi were on Research and Study Leave in Semester 1, with Matiu Ratima, Jim Williams and Michael Reilly away for Semester 2.  Pāora Tapsell has recently returned from Vienna, having given a keynote address “Waka Wairua: Imagining an Other way of knowing our Pacific” at the New Zealand Studies Association conference.  Matiu Rātima was awarded the Fulbright-Nga Pae O Te Maramatanga Scholar Award; this allows him to spend time at the University of Hawai’i to observe the teaching of Hawaiian languages.

In May, Megan Pōtiki published an article in the New Zealand Journal of History, 49, 1 (2015) on the Māori-language writings of H.K. Taiaroa and Tame Parata, and in June presented at a paper at the 4th International Conference on Language, Literature and Linguistics in Singapore on the use of old manuscripts as a means of revitalizing Kāi Tahu reo.  Megan is writing this up for publication at present.

In February, Lachy Paterson gave a Waitangi Day at the Dunedin Art Gallery on past, present and future perceptions of the Treaty of Waitangi.  As he didn’t have any teaching duties in Semester 1 he was able to travel to Canada in February/March where he gave a number of talks at the University of Alberta and University of Manitoba on ‘Indigenous Literacy and Literacy Practices: Māori in the 19th Century’ and (with Angela Wanhalla) ‘Indigenous Women, Writing and Colonialism’.  In April he presented at a conference on colonial print media at the University of Cambridge, UK.

In June Jenny Bryant-Tokalau presented a paper entitled ‘New Communities and the State in Suva, Fiji’ to the Urban Melanesia theme at the European Society for Oceanistes Conference (ESFO), in Brussels. The paper will be published in a special edition of the Journal de la Société des Océanistes in 2016.

Tangiwai Rewi has recently published an article in the Journal of the Polynesian Society, 124, 1 (2015) on ‘The Ngāruawāhia Tūrangawaewae Regatta: Today’s Reflections on the Past’.  Click here to access.

In February, Michelle Schaaf presented on ‘The role of family in Pacific migrant participation in physical activity and sport’ at the Inaugural International Conference on Migration Social Disadvantage and Health, in Melbourne.

Merata Kawharu and Karyn Paringatai both spoke at at Hui Poutama 2015: Māori Research Sympoisum in May.  Hui Poutama is the University of Ōtāgo’s biennial symposium of Māori research.  Karyn’s talk was on ‘The value of the dark: The students’ perspective’, and  Merata Kawharu’s on ‘Entrepreneurship: the relevance of a customary context. A Ngāti Whātua narrative’.

Karyn Paringatai‘s research on teaching in the dark is in demand.  She presented at a recent Pecha Kucha event at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery, and in July gave a keynote presentation at the Tuia Te Ako hui at Lincoln University.

Lyn Carter has two works in press: ‘Climate Change and Aotearoa New Zealand: A review’, a journal article with Wiley Interdisciplinary Review (LSE); and ‘Iwi are where the People are: Rethinking Ahi Kā and Ahi Matao in Contemporary Māori Society’ in the forthcoming Huia Publishers book, Home. Here to Stay!

Finally, Te Tumu is revamping its MAOR 102 textbook.  The old book, Ki te Whaiao: An Introduction to Māori Culture and Society was published in 2004, and while it had served its purpose well, staff felt that a new volume was necessary.  As with Ki te Whaiao, Te Tumu staff are doing most of the writing for this new book.

Career Advancement for Te Tumu Graduate

A belated congratulations also from Te Tumu to Matiu Payne who is now Te Ihu Takiwā Regional Manager for Te Wānanga o Aotearoa.  Matiu completed his Master of Indigenous Studies at Te Tumu, and is currently undertaking PhD study with us on Ngāti Mutunga and the Native Land Court.

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Click to read: News from Te Rūnanga o Koukourārata, Te Pānui Rūnaka: A Monthly Newsletter of Kāi Tahu News, Views and Events, May 2015.

Upcoming Te Tumu Seminar

By Professor Chris Andersen (Faculty of Native Studies, University of Alberta).

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Chris Andersen, University of Alberta.

This seminar will be followed by tea and coffee on Level 1, Te Tumu.

 

Public Lecture: “Scots and Indigenous Peoples in the Australian Colonies”

This might be of interest to some:  Professor Ann Curthoys, a leading Australian historian who specialises in indigenous-settler interactions and relations, is giving a free public lecture entitled “Scots and Indigenous Peoples in the Australian Colonies” on Monday 24 November in Castle Lecture Theatre 1 at 3.30pm.  Click here for full abstract and details.