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Category Archives: research funding

Marsden Success for Dr Erica Newman

This has been a great year for Dr Erica Newman whose research project, Journey Home: Descendants of Māori adoptees search for their tūrangawaewae, has been awarded a $300,000 Marsden Grant over three years.  This is wonderful news for Te Tumu, who now have three staff undertaking Marsden-funded research.

Summary: Māori adoptees who have no knowledge of their Māori heritage pass the unknown to their descendants. Focusing on these descendants, this project will explore; how they identify with their taha Māori, avenues they have taken to connect to their taha Māori, and how they are accepted by their whānau and hapū. I will follow participants on their journey of discovery and will examine hapū membership eligibility. Oral narratives will be the primary base for this project with published and unpublished sources used to support and highlight issues the participants encounter. This will begin a new area of research that will highlight the issues of transracial adoption on identity and well-being for descendants of Māori adoptees in Aotearoa New Zealand. [Advisor: Associate Professor Angela Wanhalla.]

Erica was also one of the award winners featured by the Royal Society Te Aparangi.

For the complete list of 2020 Marsden grant awards, click here.

Fingers Crossed for Marsden Second Round

Te Pūtea Rangahau a Marsden/Marsden Fund is one of the most prestigious opportunities for externally-funded research grants, and highly competitive.  The grants fund three-year research projects, as well as channel some income into the university.  The Marsden Fund operates as a two-stage process. Although the quality of all the initial applications (where the research idea is pitched) tends to be very high, most applicants do not get invited to submit a full proposal. In the Humanities Panel just 26.1% got through to the second round, and in Social Sciences it was 22.6%. At the second round successfully gaining a grant then becomes a (roughly) 50/50 chance.  So we can see, winning a Marsden is very hard, and getting through to the second round is worth acknowledging and celebrating.

It will now be an anxious time for our Te Tumu staff, Dr Lyn Carter and Dr Erica Newman, involved in preparing their full proposals.  

Dr Lyn Carter

Dr Lyn Carter is part of larger team led by Dr Pedersen Zari of Victoria University, with the project: Empowering Oceania Nature-based Urban Design: Knowledge sharing, Leadership and community Partnering in Climate Change Adaptation.  This is a “standard” Marsden application, i.e. submitted by experienced researchers, most often as a team.

Summary: Climate change impacts settlements of Oceania, including Aotearoa, in significant ways. ‘Nature-based solutions’ (NbS) have great potential to address these impacts. Incorporating traditional knowledge into NbS will offer more culturally appropriate and long-term solutions, however links to wellbeing agendas have not been fully explored. This research investigates how well being can be strategically linked to ecologies, and how this can be harnessed to create ecologically resilient ‘Ocean cities’. Research into how the human-nature-climate nexus can be leveraged to enhance the effectiveness of NbS will make a significant contribution to the urban climate adaptation research in Aotearoa, the Pacific, and globally.

Dr Erica Newman

Dr Erica Newman project is a “fast-start” application, which are for early career researchers, often working by themselves.  Her topic is: Journey Home: Descendants of Māori adoptees search for their tūrangawaewae.

Summary: Māori adoptees who have no knowledge of their Māori heritage pass the unknown to their descendants. Focusing on these descendants, this project will explore; how they identify with their taha Māori, avenues they have taken to connect to their taha Māori, and how they are accepted by their whānau and hapū. I will follow participants on their journey of discovery and will examine hapū membership eligibility. Oral narratives will be the primary base for this project with published and unpublished sources used to support and highlight issues the participants encounter. This will begin a new area of research that will highlight the issues of transracial adoption on identity and well-being for descendants of Māori adoptees in Aotearoa New Zealand. [Advisor: Associate Professor Angela Wanhalla.]

We all have our fingers crossed that Erica and Lyn’s projects make it through.

Te Tumu in this year’s Marsden Round

This has been a great year for research in Te Tumu. Every November Te Pūtea Rangahau a Marsden (Marsden Fund), run by the Royal Society Te Apārangi, announces its forthcoming research grants.  Winning a grant is a two stage process, with applicants having to get past a preliminary round, then develop their applications for the second round; they have about a 10% chance of success in the Humanities and Social Sciences panels.  There are six successful applications within the Division of Humanities, three of which have a Te Tumu connection.

Karyn Paringatai (Ngāti Porou)

Dr Karyn Paringatai‘s project “E kore au e ngaro! The enduring legacy of whakapapa” ($823,000, Social Sciences panel) looks at how the knowledge of whakapapa can impact on health, with particular reference to Māori affected by the CDH1 cancer-causing gene.  Click here for more information. Professor Parry Guilford, Director of Otago’s Centre for Translational Cancer Research, is an associate investigator on the project.

Angela Wanhalla (Ngāi Tahu) & Lachy Paterson

Associate Professor Lachy Paterson is a principal investigator alongside Associate Professor Angela Wanhalla (History Department) on “Te Hau Kāinga: Histories and Legacies of the Māori Home Front, 1939-1945” ($746,000, Social Sciences panel), exploring the lived experiences of Māori who remained in New Zealand during the Second World War.  Click here for more information.  Although the project begins next year, one of our undergraduate students, Haeata Watson, has already started a project looking at Ngāti Kahungunu experiences, funded through a Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga Summer Internship.

Both Karyn and Lachy are based in Te Tumu’s Māori Studies programme, occasionally teaching into the Indigenous Development programme.  Karyn also coordinates the Master of Indigenous Studies programme.

Merata Kawharu (Ngāti Whātua, Ngāpuhi)

Professor Merata Kawharu, who until recently held an adjunct position within Te Tumu but is now based at the Centre for Sustainability, was also successful.  Her project, “A question of identity: how connected are Māori youth to ancestral marae, and does it matter?” ($605,000, Humanities panel) will investigate the relationships that young Māori have with their marae.  Click here to find out more.  Merata with be working with associate investigators, Dr Stephen McTaggart (University of Auckland), former Dean of Te Tumu, Professor Paul Tapsell (now at the University of Melbourne) and Dr Krushil Watene (Massey University).

Special thanks to Marjoleine Righarts, Research and Enterprise’s Research Advisor for Humanities who helped immensely with all the applications.

Te Tumu scholar in successful Research Theme bid

jennybryant-tokalau

Jenny Bryant-Tokalau

Associate Professor Jenny Bryant-Tokalau of Te Tumu is one of 14 Principal Investigators in the recently awarded University Theme, Asia-Pacific Biocultural Health: Past and Present.

The theme, which is coordinated by Haille Buckley, Tuari Potiki, Tony Merriman and Sian Halcrow and has attracted academics from various Otago divisions,  is funded for five years.  It will investigate fundamental questions of the human past that have pressing implications for human society today in Aotearoa, the Pacific and Southeast Asia. Questions of the origins of people, non-communicable disease, and social inequality, and major subsistence and cultural change will be assessed drawing on a range of cross- and multi-disciplinary approaches mobilising research expertise in the University.

Jenny’s role in the theme is her work on adaptation to climate change and hardships and inequality in the Pacific.

Te Tumu academic wins Ngā Pae Fulbright visiting scholarship

Matiu

Dr Matiu Rātima (Te Whakatōhea and Ngāti Pukeko)

Congratulations to Dr Matiu Rātima, one of our Māori-language kaiako, who has recently been awarded a Ngā Pae Fulbright visiting scholarship to undertake research at the Mānoa campus of the University of Hawai`i, in Oahu. Matiu will be away from 10 August 2015 to 10 January 2016 during his Research and Study Leave.

While in Hawai’i where he’ll be working with Dr Keao Nesmith of the Kawaihuelani Center for Hawaiian Language on their research project titled, “Communicative Language Teaching for Indigenous Language Revitalisation”.

Globally there are few indigenous languages that are not under threat of decline or extinction. It has been estimated that of the world’s 6,912 known languages, 95% of these are spoken by less than 6% of the population. Experts forecast that less than 10 percent of the world’s living oral languages (in the year 1992) will still be spoken by 2092.  Urgent action, underpinned by good research, is vital to stop this decline.

Matiu’s research will examine four key questions.

1. How are indigenous languages being taught within universities?

2. What pedagogies are being applied?

3. What constitutes ‘best practice’ in indigenous language teaching? And;

4. How can Communicative Language Teaching help to produce speakers of indigenous languages?

The research focuses on three case studies, the teaching in universities of the Māori, Hawaiian and Tahitian languages.

Fulbright New Zealand promotes “mutual understanding between the peoples of New Zealand and the United States of America by means of educational and cultural exchange”, and offers a range of grants for New Zealand academics and graduates to research in America.

He Pūtea Rangahau – Māori Research funding opportunities

News on two upcoming Māori research funding opportunities

From Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga

We will be commissioning new research around “Optimising  Maori Economic performance”. What we would like you to do is be very creative when looking at the RFP and see how you can wrap it within your own discipline. We have funding for four projects so it is competitive. However, in these times we are pleased to offer this investment and look forward to your applications.

From the Website:

“NPM seeks to invest in research projects focussing on its research priocrity ‘Optimising Māori Economic Performance’ that aligns to its research direction. The total maximum budget available per project is $150,000 (fully costed, exclusive of GST, over 12 months). Funding is available for a 1 December 2014 commencement date.

NPM is seeking applications from individuals or groups within its PRE Network interested in undertaking research within the scope of the RFP. Applications should provide a concise summary of the research project including:

Up to two pages outlining the proposed research (goals and objectives, methods, details of the significance and/or relevance of the research); Excellence, Benefits and Transformations; An outline of the relevant collaborative arrangements; A dissemination plan; Biographical sketches; and Budget details.

The applications details are short but must contain in the proposal a specific research question and methodology. Applicants should have identified a research team and the study design and methods the team propose to use. Applicants should have secured access to information (or have clearly identified the pathways for access) and demonstrated mechanisms for engagement of key stakeholders, including the express support of Māori communities or other relevant parties where required. The research outlined in the application is expected to be feasible with a 12 month time frame and with a corresponding budget.

 Click here for contact details.

 

From Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori (Māori Language Commission) 

He pānui tōmua tēnei e pā ana ki ngā ratonga rangahau (whakaurunga kaipupuri pānga) e hiahiatia ana e Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori, e He Puna Whakarauora ā, ko tāna Rārangi Take Rangahau ā-Motu te kaupapa.

Ka puta tētahi Tono Marohi ki runga i a GETS i te marama o Mahuru.  Ko te tikanga, hei whakamōhiotanga tōmua tēnei tuhinga i ō mātou hiahia tērā pea ka whakatakotoria, te angawā me ngā here ā-mua hoki e whai wāhi ai ngā kaiwhakarato torohū ki te whakaaroaro mehemea ka pīrangi rātou ki te tāpae i tētahi tono.

Mā te Pānui Tōmua, tēnā e ai tō aro ki te pae ipurangi.

This is an advance notice of research services (stakeholder engagement) required by Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori, He Puna Whakarauora, in relation to its National Research Agenda.

A Request for Proposal will be advertised on GETS in September.  This is only intended to provide some advance notice of our likely requirements, timeframe and preconditions to enable potential suppliers to consider in advance whether they wish to submit a proposal.

For the full notice please refer to the Government Electronic Tender Service website

GETS RFx Id: 3432637, Whakaurunga Kaipupuri Pānga Reo Māori, Māori Language Stakeholder Engagement