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Tag Archives: Pacific climate change

10 questions with . . . Jenny Bryant-Tolalau

Last week we featured Lyn Carter’s new book on Indigenous Pacific responses to Climate Change and her 10-question interview with the Association of Social Anthropologists of Aotearoa/New Zealand.  Jenny Bryant-Tokalau has researched collaboratively with Lyn, and until her recent retirement, was a member of Te Tumu’s Pacific Islands Studies programme.  Jenny has published Indigenous Pacific Approaches to Climate Change, as a companion volume to Lyn’s as part of the Palgrave Studies in Disaster Anthropology series.  Click here to download Jenny’s book.   ASAA/NZ also asked Jenny the 10 questions.  Click here to see.

 

10 questions with . . . Lyn Carter.

The Association of Social Anthropologists of Aotearoa/New Zealand recently conducted a ’10 questions with’ session with Te Tumu’s Lyn Carter about her newly released book Indigenous Pacific Approaches to Climate Change: Aotearoa/New Zealand on their blogsite.  Click here to read all about it.

New book: Indigenous Pacific Approaches to Climate Change

Climate Change is an issue for the Pacific.  We are delighted to announce the lastest book by a Te Tumu scholar, Dr Lyn Carter, Indigenous Pacific Approaches to Climate Change, published as part of Palgrave’s Studies in Disaster Anthropology Series.

Dr Carter, a Ngāi Tahu scholar, is a member of Te Tumu’s Indigenous Development programme, and teaches the popular INDV301 course, Māori and Indigenous Development Ethics and Government.

From the publisher: “Situating Māori Ecological Knowledge (MEK) within traditional environmental knowledge (TEK) frameworks, this book recognizes that indigenous ecological knowledge contributes to our understanding of how we live in our world (our world views), and in turn, how we adapt to climate change.

Dr Lyn Carter

“As an industrialized nation, Aotearoa/New Zealand (A/NZ) has responsibilities and obligations to other Pacific dwellers, including its indigenous populations. In this context, Lyn Carter discusses how A/NZ can benefit from the wider Pacific strategies already in place; how to meet its global obligations to reducing greenhouse gases; and how A/NZ can utilize MEK to achieve substantial inroads into long-term adaptation strategies and sustainable practices. Carter demonstrates that in all respects Māori tribal groups are well-placed to be key players: adaptation strategies, policies, and practices are integrated throughout Māori/Iwi traditional knowledge.”

Click here to access this new book.