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Tag Archives: JPS

Journal News

 

AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples is marking its 10th anniversary showcasing some of the most popular articles from past and current issues.  You can access for FREE this month’s feature article Researching Our Relations: Reflections on Ethics and Marginalisation by Adreanne Ormond, Fiona Cram and Lyn Carter from the special issue on marginalisation, Volume 2, no. 1 (2006).
lyncarter

Lyn Carter

Dr Lyn Carter is a Senior Lecturer in Te Tumu, and the Coordinator of our Indigenous Development programme.

Click here to access the full article available for free download until the end of August.
Abstract

Marginalisation occurs when a group of people are pushed to the periphery of a society. Many Māori reside at the margins of ‘mainstream’ society, while others are at the margins of Māori society. The present paper explores how ‘by Māori, for Māori’ research and evaluation can create spaces for voices from the margins to be heard. The paper arose out of a series of hui in which papers on the notion of marginalisation and Māori were presented and discussed, along with the broader topic of research ethics and protocols. Three themes that emerged from these hui are considered in this paper: relationships between researchers and participants/communities, researchers knowing themselves, and the safety aspects inherent within tikanga. The discussion of these themes draws upon the papers that were written for this project, the feedback from hui participants (researchers, students, health professionals, government workers, community providers), and local and international literature on research ‘by and with’ indigenous peoples. In making the ‘knowing’ we hold about these issues more explicit, this paper aims to generate more discussion as well as provide some small guidance for those who may be new to this thing called ‘research’.

To find out more about AlterNative: click here
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The Journal of the Polynesian Society has been going for a little longer…

JPS9 Reasons to Publish in the Journal of the Polynesian Society

  • For nearly 125 years, an international forum for the dissemination and discussion of cross-disciplinary research of and by Pacific peoples (broadly defined), past, traditional, and contemporary.
  • Submissions welcomed from anthropology, linguistics, history, politics, sociology, visual arts and material culture studies, archaeology, biological anthropology, indigenous studies, and cultural geography
  • Issues published quarterly, peer-reviewed; full length research articles (up to 15,000 words) and shorter communications
  • Member of CrossRef index service, articles DOI-supported, Journal of Citation Reports rated
  • Rapid submission-to-print turn-around time
  • Guest-edited Special Issues welcomed & available for one-off purchase

Links:

Submissions and information

Recent Issues

Archived journals (1892-2010)