How much revenue would a New Zealand sugary drink tax raise? And how might be best to do it?

Tuesday, July 4th, 2017 | Kate Sloane | No Comments

Professors Tony Blakely and Cliona Ni Mhurchu

Last week a FIZZ symposium was run in Auckland. A key focus was moving New Zealand towards adopting a sugary drink tax. As part of the policy briefing prepared for this FIZZ Symposium, we were asked to estimate the revenue from such a tax – which we outline here, and estimate to be between $65 and $100 million a year. We also consider implementation options.

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A 100 years ago: The worst year of the First World War for New Zealand

Monday, May 1st, 2017 | hensa32p | No Comments

Professor Nick Wilson, University of Otago; Professor Glyn Harper, Massey University

The year 1917 was the worst year of the First World War for New Zealand from a premature mortality perspective, with 5547 deaths. We have just presented on this topic at a Symposium at Te Papa (Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa) and in this blog we summarise the mortality patterns we described. We also consider to what extent some of these deaths may have been preventable with knowledge available at the time. Continue reading

The marked decline of sudden mass fatality events in NZ (1900 to 2015)

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017 | Kate Sloane | 1 Comment

Professor Nick Wilson and Associate Professor George Thomson

Our recently published study on sudden mass fatality events in NZ (10+ deaths per event) found that the occurrence and mortality burden of these events has declined over time. In this blog we consider possible reasons for this trend and make suggestions for improving the knowledge base around these events.

Wahine sinking in 1968, Source: Civil Defence website photo library

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“100% Pure” – Public Health Goal Setting

Thursday, August 15th, 2013 | gibju57p | 2 Comments

Associate Professor Nick Wilson, University of Otago, Wellington


The “100% Pure” marketing of NZ is marketing hype and an easy target for UK tabloid journalists (see this NZ Herald piece). Nevertheless, there is a case for striving to achieve the “100% level” with certain threats to public health – for example, by achieving Smokefree New Zealand by 2025. Continue reading