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Author Archives: Angela Wanhalla

Book Launch

Come along and celebrate the launch of Judy Bennett and Angela Wanhalla’s co-edited book, Mothers’ Darlings of the South Pacific, beginning at 5.30 on Wednesday 13 July at Te Tumu, University of Otago. Published by the University of Otago Press (a co-publication with University of Hawaii Press), Mothers’ Darlings traces the fate of the children fathered by US servicemen who served in the South Pacific Command Area during World War II and is the major outcome of Judy’s Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden Project of the same name.

launch invitation

 

PhD Scholarship: Literary and Book History after Colonialism

University of Queensland’s Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities has a number of doctoral scholarships available. These are attached to specific projects, and you can find out more about them here. Of particular relevance to Centre followers is Project 3: Literary and Book History after Colonialism, led by Associate Professor Anna Johnston and attached to her ARC Future Fellowship.

Australian settler modernity was shaped by distinct orders of knowledge that can be traced through book history and studies of print culture. The key aim of Associate Professor Anna Johnston’s ARC Future Fellowship project is to provide fresh and challenging readings of Australia’s literary and cultural history, and to map the aftermath of colonialism in contemporary culture.

Successful applicants will be supervised by Associate Professor Anna Johnston, and will be enrolled in the School of Communication and Arts. While all relevant dissertation projects will be considered, proposals that articulate with Fellowship themes and approach are encouraged. Indicative projects could include:

  • Settler colonialism and Australian literature, past and present
  • Colonial science and natural history publications
  • Missionary writing
  • Archival or book history projects, particularly using UQ’s Fryer Library and / or AustLit
  • Non-fictional prose and literary studies

Students in literary studies, cultural and intellectual history, and postcolonial cultural studies are encouraged to apply and to refine their proposal in consultation with the project leader.

NZ Women’s Studies Association Conference 2016

Call for Papers for the Women’s Studies Association Conference (WSANZ) 2016

“Re/generation: New Landscapes in Feminism and Women’s Studies”.

2nd-3rd September at the Owen Glenn Building, The University of Auckland, Main Campus.

 

Please note that the deadline to submit an abstract is 30 June 2016.

 

The Conference keynote themes and speakers include:

  • Conference Inauguration: Prof. Ngahuia Te Awekotuku (University of Waikato)
  • Inaugural Margot Roth Lecture : Prof Priya Kurian (The University of Waikato)
  • Panel on New Directions in Justice: Prof. Rosemary Hunter (Queen Mary University, London), A/P Elisabeth McDonald (Victoria University, Wellington) & A/P Tracey McIntosh (University of Auckland)
  • Panel on Gender, Generation and Care : Prof. Ngaire Kerse (School of Population Health, University of Auckland); Dr Katherine Ravenswood (AUT), Dr Tess Moeke-Maxwell (University of Auckland)

Proposals in the following categories are welcomed: (a) 20 minute paper presentations (b) One hour panels (c) Soapbox sessions: (for undergrads and high school students; 3-5 minutes on a relevant theme) (d) Posters and (e) Performances (poetry, art).

Limited scholarships available for undergrads and high school students.

Apply by JUNE 30th !!!!  (100 words on why you want to come PLUS name of a teacher or lecturer for reference)

For more details, see http://www.wsanz.org.nz/events.htm

Symposium: Collecting and Exhibiting Photography

Te Papa is hosting a symposium on photography in June. It costs $10 for the day-long event. To register click here.

Collecting and Exhibiting Photography
Saturday 11 June, 10am 5.15pm
Nga Toi, Level 5 and Rangimarie 1, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

How do curators decide what photographs to exhibit and what to collect, and what are the ethical questions they consider? What are the implications of displaying non–art photography in an art museum? What is the significance of historical photographs in the age of digital photography? These questions and more are explored in this thought-provoking series of talks inspired by New Zealand Photography Collected.

Programme
10am–12pm: Keynote lecture and gallery walk-through
Leading art historian and photography curator Professor Geoff Batchen talks about New Zealand Photography Collected and issues related to photography curation. A walk through the exhibition with its curator, Athol McCredie, follows.

1.10pm–2.40pm: Panel – Collecting and exhibiting national collections
Panelists are Judy Annear, Senior Curator of Photographs at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Shaune Lakin, Curator at the National Gallery Australia, and Ken Hall, Curator at Christchurch Art Gallery.

3.05pm–3.25pm: Lecture – The evolution of photography curation
Ron Brownson, Senior Curator at Auckland Art Gallery, explores how the curation of photography collections has changed. He also gives examples of contemporary artists who use photographic archives in their practice.

3.25pm–5.15pm: Panel – The ethics of exhibiting photography and photographic archives
The discussion is led by writer Dr Cassandra Barnett from Massey University Wellington, joined by Te Papa Pacific Cultures curator Nina Tonga, artist Fiona Amundsen, and Dr Clare Veal, an expert on the history of photography in Thailand.

 

Space, Race, Bodies II: Sovereignty and Migration in a Carceral Age

Our colleagues in Media Film and Communications at the University of Otago are sponsoring a conference on sovereignty and migration, which will take place in early May. The Call for Papers is below.

Space, Race, Bodies II: Sovereignty and Migration in a Carceral Age
University of Otago
May 6-8th, 2016

Featuring:
Fadak Alfayadh (RISE: Refugees, Survivors and Ex-Detainees)
Tracey Barnett (Independent Journalist)
Mengzhu Fu (Shakti Youth)
Associate Professor Stephanie Fryberg (University of Washington)
Tame Iti
Moana Jackson
Crystal McKinnon and Emma Russell (Flat Out)
Suzanne Menzies-Culling and Marie Laufiso (Tauiwi Solutions)
Professor Margaret Mutu (University of Auckland)
Emilie Rākete (No Pride in Prisons)
Annette Sykes
Teanau Tuiono

Space, Race, Bodies II: Sovereignty and Migration in a Carceral Age is an academic and activist conference featuring workshops that address the intersections of criminal justice movements around the incarceration of migrants and communities of colour and Indigenous sovereign movements. SRB II builds on the momentum and opportunities enabled by the first Space, Race, Bodies conference in publicising and disseminating scholarship and activism on the intersections between geography, racism and racialisation.

Presentations and panels are invited to address, but are not limited to, the following:

surveillance and imprisonment in settler colonial and imperial histories
detention and surveillance of migrants and refugees
racial profiling and state violence towards ethnic and marginalised communities
geographies of torture in the ‘war on terror’
the geopolitics of homonormativity and pinkwashing
hate crimes and the role of imprisonment as a key modality through which rights protections are secured
intersectionality and social and political forms of exclusion
community and activist challenges to state violence and detention
Indigenous sovereign protest movements
corporeality, race and biometrics
capitalism, race and incarceration
the prison industrial complex
digital forms of enclosure and surveillance
race, racialisation and geography
climate change, migration and asylum
protest camps and state surveillance

Please note that general submissions on the theme of space, race, and embodiment are welcome. We also invite workshops, creative performance and other community forms of participation.

For more information about the conference and the SRB collective, please visit our website: http://www.spaceracebodies.com.

Abstracts of 200w with an accompanying 50w bio can be sent to: Space.Race.Bodies@otago.ac.nz

We will accept abstracts on a rolling basis until April 1, 2016.

 

Ernest Scott Prize 2016

The shortlist for the Australian Historical Association’s prestigious Ernest Scott Prize has been announced. On the list is the Centre’s director, Professor Tony Ballantyne, for his book Entanglements of Empire: Missionaries, Māori and the Question of the Body (Auckland University Press, 2015).  The Ernest Scott Prize is awarded to the book that has made the most distinguished contribution to Australian or New Zealand history or the history of colonisation.

The judges describe Entanglements of Empire as “a smart, engaging and intelligent new work, which carefully blends New Zealand historical research with new theoretical readings inspired by international scholarship. Pushing disciplinary boundaries, its novel approach in reading the early Missionary-Maori dynamic in a new light, makes this book a new spin on an ‘old’ topic. Employing new frames of reference, guided by a focus on spatial interaction and physical embodiment, this book will invite further re-readings of the early colonial encounter period in New Zealand. Elegantly written, grounded in solid primary research, Entanglements of Empire is focused on re-thinking the history of early colonial New Zealand.”

The winner will be announced at the Kathleen Fitzpatrick Lecture, University of Melbourne, on 26 April.

Congratulations Tony, and good luck!

Colonial Formations Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS

Colonial Formations: Connections and Collisions

University of Wollongong 24–25 November 2016

Keynote speakers:

Professor Clare Anderson, University of Leicester

Professor Jane Lydon, University of Western Australia

Dr Alice Te Punga Somerville, Macquarie University

Dr Virginia Marshall, University of Wollongong

This conference will explore colonial formations from a range of historical, contemporary and interdisciplinary perspectives. In particular it seeks to foreground the local and regional particularities of colonial dynamics alongside those of the more studied arena of ‘imperial formations’. We seek to continue the work of decentring the metropole, as well as to shed light on its enduring power and purchase. The conference’s framing themes of ‘connections’ and ‘collisions’ encourages enquiry into processes of borrowing, negotiation and collaboration, as well as contestation, conflict and Indigenous resurgence and mobilisation.

The conference also serves to mark the recent formation of the Colonial and Settler Studies Network (CASS) at the University of Wollongong. CASS promotes critical inquiry into the history, theoretical framing, and contemporary manifestations of colonialism on a global scale. We particularly foster work that places colonial and settler colonial formations in comparative and connected frames, and promote collaboration between scholars of diverse colonialisms.

Paper proposals might consider the following themes: Indigenous and subaltern networks and exchanges; Settler colonialism and its relation to other colonial formations past and present; Colonial mobilities and movements across different colonial spaces; Collaborations/resistance/resurgence/cultural activism; Violence and violations; Citizenship and the production of difference; Biopolitics and colonialism/settler colonialism; Gender and sexualities; The politics of memory

We are calling for proposals for both individual papers (20mins) and panels of up to 3 speakers (90mins). Proposals should include a 250-word abstract and a 50-word biographical statement for each speaker. For panels, please also include a title and brief rationale for the panel as a whole. Please send proposals to cass-admin@uow.edu.au by 10 June 2016.

The conference will be preceded on 23 November 2016 by an interdisciplinary one-day masterclass for postgraduates and early career researchers — ‘Confronting Colonialism’. This will be led by Professors Clare Anderson and Jane Lydon, along with CASS members. Participants will be mentored to develop their conference papers for submission as journal articles. Some travel bursaries will be available. Places are limited. Interested postgraduates and early career researchers who are submitting a paper for the conference can request a masterclass application form by emailing cass-admin@uow.edu.au.

We anticipate that one or more journal special issues will develop from the conference proceedings.

 

Public Lecture on Visualizing Cultural Heritage

The Department of English and Linguistics, the Postcolonial Studies Research Network, and the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture are pleased to host Professor Martina Ghosh-Schellhorn, Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany, from 14-18 March, 2016. Professor Ghosh-Schellhorn holds the Inaugural Chair in Transcultural Anglophone Studies at Saarland University. Her wide-ranging research areas include literary and cultural studies, popular culture, intermediality, popular and art-house film, diaspora studies, memory studies, museology, material culture, pedagogy and curriculum development and the canon.

While at Otago, she will give two presentations, to which all are invited.

Open Lecture

Tuesday 15 March, 5.15pm-6.15pm, Archway 2 Lecture Theatre

Hosted by The Postcolonial Studies Research Network and the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture

“Re-Configuring Government Houses: Virtual Models and Life-Worlds in Transcultural Perspective”

This talk concerns a fresh approach to visualizing cultural heritage in a Transcultural Anglophone Studies (TAS) context. In collaboration with Artificial Intelligence experts, we have undertaken research into the material history of Empire so as to re-visit received historiographies with an aim to revising them in the light of contemporary analytical tools. The focus is on British Government Houses in transcultural perspective.

What was it like to live in a British Government House? I would like to use TAS’s xml 3D virtual model of Government House Calcutta (1803-) to demonstrate the advantages of using computer technology to support research into the field of colonial architecture by incorporating into it evidence of the various life-worlds found here. Besides taking a virtual 360o tour of the building and its grounds, we will also be zooming in to one of its most representative interiors, the Throne Room. Accompanying us on our tour are a selection of the epistolary, autobiographical, as well as pictorial materials left us by the former incumbents of the House, the objects that they chose to be surrounded by, and the current use to which this still-functioning edifice is being put.

 

Department of English and Linguistics seminar presentation

Friday 18 March, 4.00-m-5.00pm, in Burns 4 Lecture Theatre

“Representing the Beautiful Forevers: Subaltern Lives Straight From the Page to the Stage?”

This talk, freely borrowed as its title is from Katherine Boo’s National Book Award winner, Behind the Beautiful Forevers (2012), seeks to address the problematic field of the so-called ‘Third World’ slum. I will be looking at Boo’s text as a project that sets out to (re-)present, for a ‘global’ readership, the lives of these Others, before moving to a recent example of another ‘global’ project: the much praised Behind the Beautiful Forevers as scripted by David Hare and performed by the National Theatre (Nov. 2014 – April 2015). What, we could ask, are the consequences when Boo’s narrative about Mumbai slum ‘dwellers’ [sic] is adapted for a mainstream British stage? Should we join the critics in their almost unanimous praise of a successful and, moreover, prescient transcultural stage production that claims to be ‘epic theatre’? What exactly are the implications of this packaging for consumption of subaltern life-narratives?

 

In Search of Almighty Voice

In this talk Professor Bill Waiser examines why the Willow Cree man Almighty Voice was the most wanted fugitive in Canada in the late nineteenth century and how his story and fate have been interpreted since his violent 1897 death at the hands of the North West Mounted Police.

The Centre is delighted to be hosting award-winning historian Bill Waiser (University of Saskatchewan), who will give a talk on his current research project on Wednesday March 9th in Burns 5 (Arts Building), beginning at 3.30.

Bill specializes in western Canadian history. He has been awarded the Saskatchewan Order of Merit, elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, granted a D.Litt., and is a University of Saskatchewan Distinguished Chair (Distinguished Professor Emeritus). His most notable publications include: Saskatchewan: A New History (2005), winner of the Clio Prize, Canadian Historical Association; and with Blair Stonechild, Loyal Till Death: Indians and the North-West Rebellion (1997), a finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award for non-fiction.

This talk is free and open to the public. Please come along!

 

Four Waves of Feminism

If you missed last month’s Making Women Visible conference, or there were papers on the programme you wanted to see, but couldn’t, then you’re in luck! The Dowse in Lower Hutt is hosting a one-day symposium, Four Waves of Feminism, on 8 April that brings together presenters from the conference, and others, to discuss feminism in contemporary art, art history and curating. This is going to be a popular event, so make sure you register your interest in attending ASAP!

 

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