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Author Archives: Angela Wanhalla

Seminar Series

This semester the Centre is hosting two research seminars. Prof. Sarah Carter (University of Alberta) and Associate Prof. Angela Wanhalla (University of Otago) will give the inaugural seminar for this year’s series on Friday 28th April. They will speak about their collaborative project relating to the life of Wiremu Colenso. The talk will take place at the Hocken Seminar Room and starts at 3.30. All are welcome!

Te Tumu Seminar by Prof. Sarah Carter

Visiting scholar and William Evans Fellow, Professor Sarah Carter (University of Alberta) is giving a research seminar on 1960s agricultural policy on First Nations reserves on Wednesday 26th April starting at 2.30. Professor Carter’s talk is hosted by Te Tumu: School of Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies at the University of Otago and will take place in Te Tumu’s ground floor performance space. All are welcome!

 

 

Prize Nomination for Visiting Scholar

The Centre for Research on Colonial Culture is pleased to learn that Professor Sarah Carter’s (University of Alberta) most recent book, Imperial Plots: Women, Land, and the Spadework of British Colonialism on the Canadian Prairies (University of Manitoba Press, 2016), has been shortlisted for the Sir John A. MacDonald Prize, which is awarded annually by the Canadian Historical Association to the “non-fiction work of Canadian history judged to have made the most significant contribution to an understanding of the Canadian past.” Also on the list is another good friend of the Centre, Adele Perry (University of Manitoba), who is nominated for Colonial Relations: The Douglas-Connolly Family and the Nineteenth-Century Imperial World (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015). Congratulations to Sarah and Adele!

Those interested in the entwined histories of gender, race and colonialism will be able to hear Professor Carter speak on these topics when she visits the University of Otago from 24 April to 14 May as a William Evans Fellow. While in Dunedin she will give a number of research talks, as well as a public lecture at Toitū Otago Settlers Museum on Sunday, May 7th. We’ll post details of these presentations very soon.

Feminist Oral History

If you happen to be in Wellington on April 7, do consider attending a public lecture on feminist oral history being presented by Lynn Abrams, one of the leading scholars in the field. Professor of Modern History at the University of Glasgow, Lynn has published widely on oral history, notably her important book, Oral history Theory. In her public lecture she will draw upon oral histories conducted with British women who came of age in the immediate post-war decades to explore the influence and meaning of feminism in life narratives. Click on ‘This isn’t very feminist at all…’ Talking about feminism with post-war British women for details.

Symposium on Individual Rights and Biopolitics

A symposium on “Individualism versus Collectivism in New Zealand and the British Empire: Individual Rights and Biopolitics” is being held at Victoria University of Wellington on Saturday 8 April (click on the Programme for further details). It features talks from leading New Zealand historians, including two from the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture: Barbara Brookes and Jane McCabe. Even better, the symposium is free! If you are interested in attending please contact Professor Charlotte Macdonald (charlotte.macdonald@vuw.ac.nz) to register.

Call for Papers Closing Soon

If you want to present at the Centre’s Filim in the Colony Symposium (co-hosted with Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision), then you have until the end of the week to submit your abstract. Details of how to submit are provided below. Make sure you don’t miss out on what promises to be an exciting interdisciplinary event.

Film in the Colony Symposium

Ockham Book Awards 2017

Warmest congratulations to Centre member Barbara Brookes, whose magnificent book A History of New Zealand Women has been shortlisted for the Illustrated Non-Fiction category in the Ockham New Zealand Book Awards!

 

 

Film in the Colony

The due date to submit abstracts for Film in the Colony has been extended to 25 March. We can confirm that the keynote speakers have been finalised and include: Dame Professor Anne Salmond, Natalie Robertson (Auckland) Dr Ian-Malcolm Rijsdijk, Dr Litheko Modisane (Cape Town). Exhibiting: Lisa Reihana (Auckland).

Make sure you get those abstracts in!

Film in the Colony Symposium

 

Connecting the Colonies: Empires and Networks in the History of the Book

The Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand Inc (BSANZ) Annual Conference 2017

Connecting the Colonies: Empires and Networks in the History of the Book

Hobart, Tasmania, Australia

22-24 November 2017

Call for Papers
Empires of all kinds – commercial, geo-political, bureaucratic – are defined by their peripheries as well as their centres, by the flows of information that maintain or destabilise their structures of authority and control.

BSANZ, in collaboration with the Society for the History of Authorship Reading and Publishing, invites scholars and researchers to consider the printed word, the book, and texts of all kinds, as both mechanism and matter of transmission.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers on any matters of bibliographical interest, traditional and contemporary. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Commercial empires: the book as a commodity in colonial contexts
  • Across boundaries: print networks across geo-political, commercial or bureaucratic borders
  • The trans-temporal: the afterlife of books and re-imagining of ideas
  • Indigenous cultures, frontier encounters, and the presence or absence of print
  • The stuff of legend: the role of print in constructing colonial and imperial consciousness
  • The book as treasured possession: emotion, ownership and display

Proposals for three-person panel discussions are also welcome.

Some financial assistance towards travel costs may be available for postgraduate students who are presenting papers. Please enquire when submitting your proposal, and include a brief budget outlining your anticipated travel costs.

Proposals – including, a 250-word abstract title of paper, name and institutional affiliation of each author, a brief biography of each author, email address of each author, and 3-5 keywords – should be sent to the convenor, Ian Morrison ian.morrison@education.tas.gov.au.

Presenters must be members of the Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand. The deadline for submissions is Friday 31 March 2017.

Forthcoming Symposium. Valued Coconuts: Hear Our Voices

Prof. Judy Bennett is convening a pre-read symposium at the Hocken Collections on 16 & 17 January 2017. It is a key outcome from her Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden Project with Dr. Kate Stevens, Constant Coconuts: A history of a versatile commodity in the Pacific World.

Valued Coconuts

This symposium focuses on six pre-circulated papers. They address different Pacific sites in regard to the history of a range of Indigenous interactions with coconuts in everyday life as well as a commodity. In addition to considering the variety of Indigenous voices, most papers also examine interactions of colonial agents—administrators, traders, planters, and mission organisations—with this commodity in the form of coconut oil or copra. There are to be assigned commentators for each paper, but presenters also have 20 minutes each to introduce and discuss their research to the wider audience.

All are welcome to attend and contribute to the discussions where appropriate. For more information contact Judy Bennett (judy.bennet@otago.ac.nz)

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