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Author Archives: Lachlan Paterson

New Publication on Indigenous Mobilities

In November 2014, CROCC co-hosted the Indigenous Mobilities symposium at Otākou Marae.  This event attracted a number of Australian historians as well as some CROCC scholars, looking at Māori and Aboriginal mobilities of the past.  ANU Press, in conjunction with Aboriginal History, have published this research as Indigenous Mobilities: Across and Beyond the Antipodes.  This edited collection can now be downloaded free in PDF or eBook form either in its entirety or as individual essays, including those of CROCC members, Tony Ballantyne, Angela Wanhalla and Lachy Paterson.

Angela Wanhalla keynote speaker at Law & History Conference

The next Australia and New Zealand Law and History Society conference is meeting at the University of Wollongong in December hosted by that university’s Centre for Colonial and Settler Studies. Its theme is “Exclusion, Confinement, Dispossession: Uneven Citizenship and Spaces of Sovereignty”, with the call for papers closing on 20 July.  It’s great news that Angela Wanhalla, CROCC co-director, will be a keynote speaker at this conference, drawing on her Rutherford Fellowship research on marriage in conjunction with the conference themes.

Click on image to enlarge.

“Redcoat and Rifle” at Toitū

Professor Charlotte Macdonald from Victoria University drew a large crowd to the Centre’s second Global Dunedin lecture at Toitū Settlers Museum today.  Charlotte brought Dunedin into the larger picture of the global circulation of soldiers and their belongings that stretched between Britain, India and the rest of the Empire.  Her wide-ranging talk included the 70th Regiment who were transferred from India (where they had fought during the Indian Rebellion) to Auckland in 1861.  While some stayed in the North Island and fought in the Waikato campaign, one contingent was transferred to Dunedin where they established themselves on what eventually became the Arthur St School. Soon after gold had been discovered in Central Otago, the contingent helped keep the peace and good order until they left in 1863.  Charlotte’s research comes out of her Marsden-funded project, Soliders of Empire: Garrison and Empire in the 19th Century. The talk was followed by a lively question time.  Many thanks to Charlotte for her rich and engaging lecture.

Successful Start to Global Dunedin

The first Global Dunedin programme at Toitū Otago Settlers Museum began with Centre Co-Director, Professor Tony Ballantyne, presenting on “The John Wickliffe, the Philip Laing and the Making of the Otago Colony”.  Tony’s lecture was wide-ranging, taking us from the initial landing of the Free Church settlers, and their interactions with Kāi Tahu, right through to the 50th anniversary, where the the debate centred on who truly deserved to be included into the category of “early” settler.

The Centre’s Global Otago programme brings engaging speakers to Toitū, who can place Dunedin in a global context, whether in the past, present or future. This lecture was a resounding success, with more seats having to be brought in to accommodate the crowd.  Professor Charlotte Macdonald will be delivering the April lecture; details will be posted soon.

Public and Popular History

The Centre was pleased to host Tanya Evans of Macquarie University who gave a public lecture last week.  While this was Tanya’s first trip to New Zealand, we also welcomed back a more regular visitor from Australia, Kristyn Harman (University of Tasmania) accompanied by her partner, Nick Brodie.

Academics are encouraged to make their research more “impactful”, which for Humanities scholars is often to get their research out beyond the narrow academic enclaves we work in.  Presentations from all of three of the visitors above were relevant to this theme.  Tanya, Director of Macquarie’s Research Centre for Applied History, discussed ‘The Emotions of Family History’, looking at why family historians and genealogists undertake their research, and how such research informs wider community understanding of, and individuals’ emotional connection to the past.  In her investigations, Tanya interacts with family historians, with her research having far more impact than that of more siloed academic history.

Kristyn Harman (centre) and the Tuesday Club, Toitū Early Settlers Museum.

Kristyn was in Dunedin to launch her new book, Cleansing the Colony: Transporting Convicts from New Zealand to Van Diemen’s Land (published by Otago University Press) which examines the more than 100 people sent from New Zealand into the Australian penal institutions.  Kristyn also gave a lecture on these convicts to the Tuesday Club at Toitū: Otago Settlers Museum last week.  Although most of the Club are retired and from many walks of life, they were keen, attentive, and intellectually engaged, with Kristyn’s talk attracting their largest crowd of the year.

Nick Brodie is an established Australian popular historian, author of Kin, 1787, and The Vandemonian War.  Although he has his own academic background in history and archaeology, he now reaches a much larger market through well-researched but accessible books.  Nick shared his own publishing experiences in a seminar to both staff and postgraduates at the university, with tips on how to make history relevant and engaging for non-academic audiences.

 

Te Tumu seminar today

A seminar being held today in Te Tumu may be of interest to CROCC subscribers. Tahu Pōtiki (Kāi Tahi, Kāti Mamoe) of Ōtākou Marae, former CEO of Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu (TRONT), will be presenting on Ka aru tātou i te aha? What are we pursuing, what is the outcome?”

Where: R3S10 (on third floor of Te Tumu, University of Otago)

When: 2.00 pm, Wednesday 4 October.

Abstract: Has the development of the Ngāi Tahu policy framework created a new identity?

Since 1998, Ngāi Tahu has grown demographically, in size and structure. Marae and kāinga have been significantly made-over. The iwi is well known as a successful tribe and business. Tahu Pōtiki has been integrally involved within his iwi, hapū and whānau for his lifetime. In this seminar he will discuss how the Ngāi Tahu policy framework has created a new identity. He will critique key policy initiatives that he was fundamental in instigating.

All interested people are welcome to attend.

Jane McCabe’s new book on Indian migrants

Last Thursday saw the successful launch of Jane McCabe’s new book, Race, Tea and Colonial Resettlement: Imperial Families, Interrupted at the Hocken Collections.  Launched by Centre Co-director, Angela Wanhalla, this monograph (published by Bloomsbury) explores the experiences of the “Kalimpong Kids”, mixed-race children of tea planters in India, from their missionary-run boarding school, to their migration to New Zealand.   Jane is descended of one of the children, and a number of other descendants came to the launch.

Dr Jane McCabe

Jane, who works in the Department of History and Art History is a keen member of the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture.  A Marsden Grant recipient, she is now researching land and inheritance in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Dr Kate Stevens and Associate Professor Will Sweetman

Kalimpong Kids descendants

Emeritus Professor Erik Olssen, Dr Jonathan West, and Associate Professor Annabel Cooper.

Centre Refunded

It is great news that the University of Otago has refunded the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture for a further five years, one of just twelve “flagship research centres”.

As Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research and Enterprise) Professor Richard Blaikie noted, the University’s funding and other support of its flagship research centres and research themes is an important way of ensuring the internationally outstanding work of its researchers, across a wide range disciplines, is encouraged and nurtured.  “We recognise that our researchers in these centres and themes are often world-leading in many areas and we are pleased to be able to back them to pursue excellence in their fields.”

The Centre now has two co-directors, Professor Tony Ballantyne and Associate Professor Angela Wanhalla.  A number of events are planned over the coming years, about which information will be forthcoming soon.

New Book on Religious Childhoods

Creating Religious Childhoods in Anglo-world and British Colonial Contexts, 1800-1950 is a new co-edited collection from Centre member, Hugh Morrison, and Mary Clare Martin (Greenwich University, UK).  This new book, published by Routledge, features children and religion in colonial society contexts such as New Zealand, and aims to develop greater understanding of religion as a critical element of modern children’s and young people’s history.

‘Mrs Stevens and her probationers with the hospital baby’, alongside article by Mary Budden, ‘Almora Christian Families’, in LMS Chronicle, July 1895, p. 182 (from Chapter 1, p. 27)

Arguing that religion was an abiding influence (positive, negative and benign) among British-world children throughout the nineteenth century and much of the twentieth, the book places ‘religion’ at the centre of analysis and discussion, while at the same time positioning the religious factor within a broader social and cultural framework. Essays written by an international grouping of scholars focus on a range of geographical settings: America, Australia, Britain, Canada, Fiji, India, New Zealand, South Africa and the South Pacific. The various contexts within which religion shaped childhood in these settings – mission fields, churches, families, communities, institutions, camps, schools and youth movements – are treated as ‘sites’ in which religion contributed to identity formation, albeit in different ways relating to such factors as empire, nation, gender, race, disability and denomination. Chapters on New Zealand include: an examination of southern Dunedin’s religious identity; children’s religious literature published by A.H. & A.W. Reed; and the ways in which religious identity was conflated with civic qualities of sacrifice and service.

Rage Against the Machine Symposium

On April 8, Victoria University is hosting the symposium Rage Against the Machine: Biopolitics, Individualism and Collectivism in 19th Century New Zealand and the British Empire in Wellington.

At the event, discussion is invited around the subject of the current comparative research project on individualism vs collectivism of Fulbright Scholar Anna Clark (University of Minnesota). Responses to the themes, topics and questions posed by the project are warmly invited.

For more information on Professor Clark’s project and the symposium, click: RageAgainsttheMachineSymposium

VUW Contact: Charlotte Macdonald, tel + 64 4 463 6761, charlotte.macdonald@vuw.ac.nz.

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