Skip to Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Site Map Menu
Search

Centre for Research on Colonial Culture
Rethinking Colonialism & its Legacies

New Zealand’s Sexual Histories

Over the past two days a group of scholars have been talking about sex, and New Zealand’s sexual histories in particular.  Angela Wanhalla and Chris Brickell, both Centre members, co-convened this event, funded by a Rutherford Discovery Fellowship and the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture, which brought together 10 scholars for a pre-read workshop at St Margaret’s College on 1 & 2 July. Participants discussed the benefits and limitations of demographic approaches to the study of sexuality (Hera Cook), New Zealand’s anti-masturbation movement (Lindsay Watson), the Health Department’s sex education pamphlets (Claire Gooder), non-monogamy and swinging in post-war New Zealand (Lily Emerson), sexuality and morality in colonial Otago (Sarah Carr), sexuality and infertility (Jane Adams), intimacy, desire and friendship in young people’s diaries (Chris Brickell), and childbirth on migrant ships (Ali Clarke). Professor Matt Cook (Birkbeck) also participated in the workshop, in addition to giving a beautiful and elegant public lecture based on his latest book, Queer Domesticities: Homosexuality and Home Life in Twentieth-Century London (Palgrave, 2014). A special issue of the New Zealand Journal of History based on the papers presented at the workshop will appear in 2016. And we highly recommend you go listen to Professor Matt Cook talk about his new book at Victoria University of Wellington on Monday 6 July. Find out more about his talk here.

Back: Hera Cook, Claire Gooder, Lily Emerson, Jane Adams, and Lindsay Watson. Front: Angela Wanhalla, Matt Cook, Chris Brickell and Ali Clarke.

Back: Hera Cook, Claire Gooder, Lily Emerson, Jane Adams, and Lindsay Watson. Front: Angela Wanhalla, Matt Cook, Chris Brickell and Ali Clarke.

Queer Domesticities: taking queer history indoors

The Centre is delighted to be hosting Matt Cook, Professor of Modern History at Birkbeck College, University of London, who will give a public lecture based on his latest book at the University of Otago this week. He will discuss his latest book, Queer Domesticities: homosexuality and home life in twentieth century London, to make a case for the importance of domestic space in the making of queer – and here queer male – desires and relationships.

Professor Cook’s lecture will take place in Burns 2 Lecture Theatre (in the Arts Building, 95 Albany Street), on Wednesday 1 July, beginning at 5.15.

This is a free event and all are welcome to attend.

Hope to see you there!

Conference on New Zealand’s Scientific Heritage

CALL FOR PAPERS: FINDING NEW ZEALAND’S SCIENTIFIC HERITAGE
Venue: Victoria University of Wellington
Date: 23-24 November 2015

2015 is a significant year for New Zealand science history. It is 150 years since James Hector arrived in Wellington to set up many of our national science organisations and 100 years since Ernest Marsden arrived in Wellington.

In 1865 Hector was appointed head of the New Zealand Geological Survey, with his responsibilities eventually including the Colonial Museum, Colonial Observatory, Meteorological Service, Colonial Botanic Gardens, and the New Zealand Institute. In 1915, Marsden arrived in New Zealand to be professor of physics at Victoria University. He stayed in this position for seven years then, in 1926, was appointed head of New Zealand’s Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, a position he held until 1946.

In 1983, The Royal Society of New Zealand and the Alexander Turnbull Library ran a conference In Search of New Zealand’s Scientific Heritage. In the more than 30 years since this date there have been significant research and publications into New Zealand’s science history but there is still much to explore. The 2015 anniversaries invite a renewed focus on New Zealand’s science history and provide momentum leading up to the Royal Society of New Zealand’s 150th anniversary in 2017 and the 250th anniversary of the arrival of the first European scientists in 2019.

The conference committee invites proposals for individual papers, panels, and posters for Finding New Zealand’s Scientific Heritage, 23-24 November 2015. Proposals are due 30 June, 2015. Find out more about the conference, keynote speakers, and how to submit an abstract in the attached CFP.

 

Seddon biography shortlisted for prize

Congratulations to CRoCC member, Professor Tom Brooking, from all in the Centre for being shortlisted for the prestigious Ernest Scott Prize, awarded by the Australian Historical Association for best book in Australian and New Zealand history. You can read about Tom’s competition here. Three New Zealand history books are shortlisted, including Tangata Whenua by Atholl Anderson, Judith Binney and Aroha Harris, which includes a contribution by another CRoCC member, Dr. Michael Stevens. The winner will be announced at the Australian Historical Association conference dinner in July. Congratulations to all who have been shortlisted!

 

 

Two MA scholarships offered

Are you interested in New Zealand history? Are you looking for scholarship funding? If you have a BA (hons) first class in History or Māori Studies then you’re in luck. Two Centre members, Michael Stevens and Angela Wanhalla, are seeking applicants for MA scholarships attached to their respective Royal Society of New Zealand research projects. See the details below for further information.

 

MA Scholarship in New Zealand History

History or background of award

The scholarship is attached to a Rutherford Discovery Fellowship project led by Dr. Angela Wanhalla (Department of History and Art History, University of Otago) on ‘The Politics of Intimacy in New Zealand History’, and funded by the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Purpose of award

Applications are invited from suitably qualified students interested in working on an aspect of private life and the law, particularly associated with the governance and control of marriage in New Zealand, during the nineteenth and/or twentieth centuries. Potential areas of investigation include, but are not limited to: marital violence; bigamy; arranged marriage; customary marriage and the law; cross-cultural relationships and the law; Māori marriage; co-habitation; marital property.

Selection criteria

The successful applicant will have a BA honours (first class), or equivalent in History. A background in New Zealand history is preferred.

Number of awards offered

One

Value

$16,000 stipend, plus tuition fees

Tenure of award

One year, or two years part-time.

Start date:

You may begin the thesis at any stage during 2015, or by 1 July 2016 at the latest.

Further Information

Please send a cover letter, a copy of your academic record, a thesis proposal, and a sample piece of writing to Angela Wanhalla (angela.wanhalla@otago.ac.nz) by 22 June.

 

 

MA Scholarship in New Zealand History

History or background of award

The scholarship is attached to a Marsden Fast-Start project led by Dr. Michael Stevens (Department of History and Art History, University of Otago) entitled ‘Between Local and Global: A World History of Bluff’, which is funded by the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Purpose of award

Applications are invited from suitably qualified students interested in working on an aspect of maritime history, ideally with a focus on southern New Zealand and/or with a strong Māori focus, during the nineteenth and/or twentieth centuries. Potential areas of investigation include, but are not limited to: cargo handling; port development (e.g. reclamation; pilotage; built environment); boat-building; commercial fishing; crew culture; marriage patterns; mahinga kai; gendered occupations; intergenerational family businesses; associational culture; religion; class conflict (e.g. strikes and lockouts).

Selection criteria

The successful applicant will have a BA honours (first class) or equivalent, in History or Māori Studies. A background in New Zealand history is strongly preferred.

Number of awards offered

One.

Value

$16,000 stipend (paid in monthly installments), plus tuition fees.

Tenure of award

One year.

Start date:

You may begin the thesis during any stage of 2015, or by 1 March 2016 at the latest.

Further Information

Please send a cover letter, a copy of your academic record, a thesis proposal, and a sample piece of writing to Michael Stevens (michael.stevens@otago.ac.nz) by 22 June.

 

Oceanian Journeys and Sojourns

An exciting new book, Oceanian Journeys and Sojourns: Home thoughts abroad, edited by Centre member, Professor Judy Bennett, was launched last night.

judy

Professor Judy Bennett, editor of Oceanian Journeys and Sojourns.

A good crowd squeezed into the Pacific Islands Centre at the University of Otago to attend this launch.  Assoc Prof Jenny Bryant-Tokalau (Te Tumu) introduced the book, which “focuses on how Pacific Island peoples – Oceanians – think about a range of journeys near and far: their meanings, motives and implications.”  The book, published by Otago University Press, is notable for having mostly authors who are Pacific Islanders, including a number of women.

Narratives of Colonial Conflict

This afternoon CRoCC member Associate Professor Annabel Cooper is presenting her research in the Department of Sociology, Gender and Social Work seminar series. The topic is ‘Narrating Colonial Conflict in the Early 1980s: Some Reflections on the Culture Moment of Utu‘. Her seminar examines how Utu re-makes the colonial past within a tumultuous present. It traces the film’s links to a series of documentaries of the same era, including Bastion Point – Day 507 (Mita, Narbey, Pohlmann, 1980), The Bridge – A Story of Men in Dispute (Pohlmann, Mita, 1982), and Patu! (Mita, 1983), and to the drama series The Governor (1977); and it investigates the contributions of significant individuals involved in the production, including Keith Aberdein, Wi Kuki Kaa, Merata Mita, and Anzac Wallace.

Annabel’s seminar begins at 3pm this afternoon at 530 Castle Street (530 C1).

 

Website!

The Centre for Research on Colonial Culture is proud to announce the creation of a website to support the Centre and its researchers. Click here to check it out. We hope you like it and encourage you to bookmark it. The blog will still be operating, and will continue to be a important site for advertising events, as well as communicating news about research, publications and seminars. So continue to follow us, but also check out the website.

Thanks to the University of Otago’s Web Services and Tushar Robins, Humanities Division, for helping to bring about the website.

 

Dunedin’s Genetic Inheritance and Caribbean Cultural Thought.

The Centre has recently hosted two riveting research-based talks.

IMG_5572a

Professor Lisa Matisoo-Smith

The first, on Sunday 10 May, was part of the Centre’s ongoing project, Global Dunedin.  Professor Lisa Matisoo-Smith, a biological anthropologist from Genetics Otago gave a public lecture at Toitū: Otago Settlers Museum, “Who do you think you are – Dunedin?”

Lisa discussed the genetic ancestry of Dunedin’s population based on the testing of randomly selected DNA samples.  This research is part of  the “Africa to Aotearoa” project, in which Lisa looks at the deep ancestry of New Zealanders, which in turn is part of a wider international study, the Genographic project, funded in part by National Geographic.   While one might  suspect that Dunedin’s genetic make-up is essentially homogenous from its Scottish heritage, the research shows just how diverse Dunedin’s population is, in line with other major cities in New Zealand.

IMG_5574

Dr Aaron Kamugisha

On Thursday, May 15 visiting scholar Dr Aaron Kamugisha gave a CRoCC seminar, “The Caribbean’s Intellectual History through Culture”. Aaron discussed the global impact of Caribbean theorist’s, particularly CLR James, amongst others, on the development and dissemination of anti-colonial thought and intellectual traditions. He placed these theorists in the context of the development of two threads of intellectual history: Caribbean Studies and Caribbean Cultural Studies, but argued that these thinkers ought to be understood in term of Caribbean radical thought.

 

 

James Cowan Research now published.

“Born to a soldier-settler family at the end of a decade of colonial conflict, James Cowan grew up on the site of the Battle of Ōrākau. In the anxious years after the Waikato War, he learned the language and the stories of people on both sides. He went on to become a journalist and a historian of colonial New Zealand, and perhaps the most widely-read interpreter between Māori and Pākehā cultures in the first half of the twentieth century.”

In February 2014 a successful one-day conference on James Cowan and his impact was held at the Alexander Turnbull Library, jointly organized by Associate Professor Annabel Cooper from CROCC and Ariana Tikao, Research Librarian Māori at the Turnbull.  Research from the conference has now been published (freely available online) in a special issue of the Journal of New Zealand Studies, James Cowan and the Legacies of Late Colonial Culture in Aotearoa New Zealand”.

Follow

Follow this blog

Get every new post delivered right to your inbox.

Email address