Skip to Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Site Map Menu
Search

Centre for Global Migrations
Exploring historical and contemporary migrations

2019 De Carle Lecture Series: Talk Five

Free Public Lecture

‘Rent and refuge: Scotland’s street-wise history of sanctuary and solidarity’

Professor Alison Phipps

University of Glasgow

Wednesday 21 August 2019, 3.30pm
Burns 5 Lecture Theatre, Arts/Burns Building, Albany Street, University of Otago

Please join us for the fifth talk of the 2019 De Carle Distinguished Lecture Series, co-hosted with the History and Art History Programme and Politics Programme.

From Iona to Mary Barbour in Govan, from the poll-tax to the dawn raids, Glasgow has given Scotland a model which bucks the trends for large industrial cities in Britain, and has shaped grassroots action which speak to a certain political history. This talk will examine the movements of resistance and political change that have been a direct challenge to the hostile environment policy of the May government.

2019 De Carle Lecture Series: Talk Four

Free Public Lecture

‘Refugee integration and the arts of hospitality’

Professor Alison Phipps

University of Glasgow

Tuesday 13 August 2019, 7.30pm
Mornington Methodist Church, Corner of Galloway and Whitby Streets, Mornington, Dunedin

Please join us for the fourth talk of the 2019 De Carle Distinguished Lecture Series, co-hosted with Mornington Methodist Church and the Dunedin Interfaith Council.

This talk will reflect on the role played by faith communities in the welcome of refugees to Europe, and especially to Scotland over the past 10 years. It will share stories from individual countries but also from the City of Glasgow, known for its campaigning offer of hospitality and protection, and from personal hosting. It will also consider the reluctance of congregations and communities to act until a point of crisis had been reached and the compatibility of faith-based teachings, prayer and obedience to teachings with the practical realities of societies in the grip of fear. Using poetry, liturgy and story the talk will take the form of a journey out into the public square and back into the recesses of the spirit.

2019 De Carle Lecture Series: Talk Three

Free Public Lecture

‘Destitution, Deportation and their consequences: Considerations from Law and Language’

Professor Alison Phipps

University of Glasgow

Monday 12 August 2019, 5.30pm
Moot Court, Richardson Building, University of Otago

Please join us for the third talk of the 2019 De Carle Distinguished Lecture Series, co-hosted with the Faculty of Law.

This lecture engages with long standing interests of Professor Phipps in the way the legal context works with and intersects with the languages of asylum seekers and refugees.

Migration, Health and Wellbeing draft conference programme

We are delighted to publicise the draft Programme 1 Aug 2019 (PDF, 254KB) for our Migration, Health and Wellbeing conference taking place in November 2019. Our keynote speakers – Professor Alison Phipps, Dr Kevin Pottie, and Ms Fadheela Ahmed – will be joined by delegates from many parts of the world in what promises to be a wonderful event.

Early bird registration (before 1 October 2019) for the conference is now available on the conference website.

Global Migrations 2019 Public Lecture Series Talk 2: Life and Death on the Otago Goldfields

Free Public Lecture

 

‘Life and Death on the Otago goldfields’

Professor HALLIE BUCKLEY, DR CHARLOTTE KING AND DR PETER PETCHEY

University of Otago

Sunday 18 August 2019, 2pm
Toitū Otago Settlers Museum

 

Please join us for the second talk in our 2019 Global Migrations Public Lecture Series when our members Professor Hallie Buckley, Dr Charlotte King and Dr Peter Petchey discuss life and death on the Otago goldfields.

The Otago gold rushes began in 1861 with the discovery of gold at Gabriel’s Gully (where Lawrence now stands). The first gold miners were predominantly European men, with Chinese miners arriving in numbers from 1866, and women and children becoming gradually more common on the goldfields after initial settlement. Recently we have begun to gain unique insight into the lives, experiences and hardships of the people of the goldfields through archaeological excavations at cemeteries associated with the gold rushes. Our work focuses on the first Lawrence cemetery (in use between 1861 and 1867), now private residential land, and the “Chinese” section of the new cemetery (in use from 1867). In this talk we will bring to light the stories of these early goldminers using evidence from the bones and material remains of the people themselves.

2019 De Carle Lecture Series: Talk Two

Free Public Lecture

‘Ceremonial and spiritual reflections on creativity and reconciliation in integration’

Professor Alison Phipps

University of Glasgow

Wednesday 7 August 2019, 5.30pm
Moot Court, Richardson Building, University of Otago

Please join us for the second talk of the 2019 De Carle Distinguished Lecture Series, co-hosted with the National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies and the Theology programme.

This lecture takes an anthropological approach to the work of memory and reconciliation in communities where conflict and trauma have left, passed through, arrived and also survived. It focuses also on theological and spiritual dimensions and how the arts facilitate these.

 

2019 De Carle Lecture Series: Talk One

Free Public Lecture

‘Arts-based methods and cultural approaches to refugee integration’

Professor Alison Phipps

University of Glasgow

Tuesday 30 July 2019, 12.30pm
Dunedin Public Art Gallery, The Octagon

Please join us for the first talk of the 2019 De Carle Distinguished Lecture Series, co-hosted with the School of Performing Arts.

Drawing on many years of working with the arts in a variety of international settings, Professor Phipps will consider how arts-based methods enable intercultural dialogue, challenge and also facilitate the amelioration of xenophobia and are a vital element in the work of integrating refugees and communities.

2019 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer: Professor Alison Phipps

We are delighted to announce that the University of Otago 2019 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer is Professor Alison Phipps, UNESCO Chair of Refugee Integration through Languages and the Arts and Professor of Languages and Intercultural Studies at the University of Glasgow, Scotland.

As part of her appointment as the De Carle Distinguished Lecturer, Professor Phipps will provide 7 public talks on themes relating to refugee integration.

All talks are free and all are welcome to attend. Please check themes, dates, times and venues in the poster below.

For the press release surrounding Professor Phipps’ visit please click here.

 

Global Migrations 2019 Public Lecture Series Talk 1: Ancient DNA and Human Migration

Free Public Lecture

 

‘The Power and Pitfalls of Ancient DNA: What ancient DNA can and can’t tell us about ancient human migrations’

Professor Lisa Matisoo-Smith

University of Otago

Sunday 21 July 2019, 2pm
Toitū Otago Settlers Museum

 

Please join us for the first talk in our 2019 Global Migrations Public Lecture Series when Professor Lisa Matisoo-Smith discusses ancient DNA and human migration.

The developments in ancient DNA technology in the last 10 years have allowed for the generation of new data that have challenged a number of assumptions about past human migrations. Many high profile publications have resulted, yet we have also seen cases where initial interpretations have been shown to be problematic. This talk will discuss some of the new findings that have progressed our understanding of human migration history and also some of the problems we have seen in the interpretation of aDNA data which highlight the need for better engagement and integration across disciplines.

 

 

Global Migrations public lecture series 2019

We are delighted to announce details of our 2019 Global Migrations public lecture series. Our talks take place at 2pm on the third Sunday of every month between July and November 2019 at Toitū Otago Settlers Museum.