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Centre for Global Migrations
Exploring historical and contemporary migrations

New Publication: Migration, Education and Translation

We are delighted to announce that Migration, Education and Translation, an edited volume emerging from our 2017 symposium, will be published soon. Edited by our Associate Directors, Professor Henry Johnson and Dr Vivienne Anderson, this multidisciplinary collection examines the connections between education, migration and translation across school and higher education sectors, and a broad range of socio-geographical contexts.

Organised around the themes of knowledge, language, mobility, and practice, it brings together studies from around the world to offer a timely critique of existing practices that privilege some ways of knowing and communicating over others. With attention to issues of internationalisation, forced migration, minorities and indigenous education, this volume asks how the dominance of English in education might be challenged, how educational contexts that privilege bi- and multi-lingualism might be re-imagined, what we might learn from existing educational practices that privilege minority or indigenous languages, and how we might exercise ‘linguistic hospitality’ in a world marked by high levels of forced migration and educational mobility. As such, it will appeal to scholars across the social sciences with interests in education, migration and intercultural communication.

As well as chapters from the editors, the volume includes contributions from the following staff, postgraduate students, affiliates and Visiting Scholars of the Centre for Global Migrations: Dr Rachel Raffery, Dr Naoko Inoue, Dr Tiffany Cone, and Professor Alison Phipps. Congratulations everyone.

Further details are available here.

2019 De Carle Lecture Series: Talk 7

Free Public Lecture

‘Idioms of Distress: Well-being and Mental Resilience in Displaced Peoples, Refugee Populations and Global Mental Health’

Professor Alison Phipps

University of Glasgow

Thursday 28 November 2019, 5.15pm
Castle 1 Lecture Theatre, University of Otago

Please join us for the final talk of the 2019 De Carle Distinguished Lecture Series, co-hosted with the Centre for International Health, the Dunedin School of Medicine, and the Otago Medical School.

This lecture will present work from four contexts internationally where psychotherapeutic access to trauma services is non-existent but other resources are marshalled by affected populations – Ghana, Gaza, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. Focusing on migratory languages and arts, it demonstrates how global mental health frameworks may be expanded.

Global Migrations 2019 Public Lecture Series Talk 5: The Scottish Role in Developing the Ceylon Tea Enterprise

Free Public Lecture

 

‘The Scottish Role in Developing the Ceylon Tea Enterprise’

PROFESSOR ANGELA MCCARTHY

University of Otago

Sunday 17 November 2019, 2pm
Toitū Otago Settlers Museum

 

Please join us for the last talk in our 2019 Global Migrations Public Lecture Series when our director, Professor Angela McCarthy, discusses the Scottish influence on the development of the Ceylon tea enterprise.

The talk will chart the role of Scots in the development of Ceylon tea, especially the influence of James Taylor, renowned in Sri Lanka today as the ‘father of the Ceylon tea enterprise’. What factors gave Scots an edge in the plantation economy of Ceylon, and what is the legacy of that influence today?

Global Migrations 2019 Public Lecture Series Talk 4: Educational Outcomes for Former Refugees in New Zealand

Free Public Lecture

 

‘A Fair Go? Educational Outcomes for Former Refugees in New Zealand’

DR RACHEL RAFFERTY

University of Otago

Sunday 20 October 2019, 2pm
Toitū Otago Settlers Museum

 

Please join us for the fourth talk in our 2019 Global Migrations Public Lecture Series when our member Dr Rachel Rafferty discusses the educational outcomes for former refugees in New Zealand.

This talk presents evidence on how refugee background students are doing in New Zealand’s education system, and makes suggestions for offering more targeted support that could enhance the rates of academic success for these young people.

2019 De Carle Lecture Series: Talk Six

Free Public Lecture

‘Researching multilingually with displaced peoples’

Professor Alison Phipps

University of Glasgow

Friday 6 September 2019, 12.00pm
Burns 7 Lecture Theatre, Arts Building, Albany Street, University of Otago

Please join us for the sixth talk of the 2019 De Carle Distinguished Lecture Series, co-hosted with the Languages and Cultures Programme and English Language Partners.

Taking the categories of race, gender and class as her starting point, Professor Phipps develops a thesis in this lecture which situates language as both social category and social construct, arguing for an approach to methods across the academy which is supple enough to deconstruct monolingual assumptions of Anglo-normativity and work multilingually within research frameworks.

Global Migrations 2019 Public Lecture Series Talk 3: Chinese music performance in colonial New Zealand

Free Public Lecture

 

‘Chinese music performance in colonial New Zealand’

Professor HENRY JOHNSON

University of Otago

Sunday 15 September 2019, 2pm
Toitū Otago Settlers Museum

 

Please join us for the third talk in our 2019 Global Migrations Public Lecture Series when our member Professor Henry Johnson discusses Chinese music performance in colonial New Zealand.

New Zealand’s Chinese musical history is an important cultural contribution in the making of the nation. This talk examines how and why social action and confluence between the Chinese and other communities were key aspects of musicking in colonial Aotearoa New Zealand.

2019 De Carle Lecture Series: Talk Five

Free Public Lecture

‘Rent and refuge: Scotland’s street-wise history of sanctuary and solidarity’

Professor Alison Phipps

University of Glasgow

Wednesday 21 August 2019, 3.30pm
Burns 5 Lecture Theatre, Arts/Burns Building, Albany Street, University of Otago

Please join us for the fifth talk of the 2019 De Carle Distinguished Lecture Series, co-hosted with the History and Art History Programme and Politics Programme.

From Iona to Mary Barbour in Govan, from the poll-tax to the dawn raids, Glasgow has given Scotland a model which bucks the trends for large industrial cities in Britain, and has shaped grassroots action which speak to a certain political history. This talk will examine the movements of resistance and political change that have been a direct challenge to the hostile environment policy of the May government.

2019 De Carle Lecture Series: Talk Four

Free Public Lecture

‘Refugee integration and the arts of hospitality’

Professor Alison Phipps

University of Glasgow

Tuesday 13 August 2019, 7.30pm
Mornington Methodist Church, Corner of Galloway and Whitby Streets, Mornington, Dunedin

Please join us for the fourth talk of the 2019 De Carle Distinguished Lecture Series, co-hosted with Mornington Methodist Church and the Dunedin Interfaith Council.

This talk will reflect on the role played by faith communities in the welcome of refugees to Europe, and especially to Scotland over the past 10 years. It will share stories from individual countries but also from the City of Glasgow, known for its campaigning offer of hospitality and protection, and from personal hosting. It will also consider the reluctance of congregations and communities to act until a point of crisis had been reached and the compatibility of faith-based teachings, prayer and obedience to teachings with the practical realities of societies in the grip of fear. Using poetry, liturgy and story the talk will take the form of a journey out into the public square and back into the recesses of the spirit.

2019 De Carle Lecture Series: Talk Three

Free Public Lecture

‘Destitution, Deportation and their consequences: Considerations from Law and Language’

Professor Alison Phipps

University of Glasgow

Monday 12 August 2019, 5.30pm
Moot Court, Richardson Building, University of Otago

Please join us for the third talk of the 2019 De Carle Distinguished Lecture Series, co-hosted with the Faculty of Law.

This lecture engages with long standing interests of Professor Phipps in the way the legal context works with and intersects with the languages of asylum seekers and refugees.

Migration, Health and Wellbeing draft conference programme

We are delighted to publicise the draft Programme 1 Aug 2019 (PDF, 254KB) for our Migration, Health and Wellbeing conference taking place in November 2019. Our keynote speakers – Professor Alison Phipps, Dr Kevin Pottie, and Ms Fadheela Ahmed – will be joined by delegates from many parts of the world in what promises to be a wonderful event.

Early bird registration (before 1 October 2019) for the conference is now available on the conference website.