REMINDER – submissions closing soon

Thursday, June 26th, 2014 | peaer75p | No Comments

MEDIANZ: Media Studies Journal of Aotearoa New Zealand

 Surveillance, Copyright, Privacy: the end of the open Internet?

 Updated Call for Papers—Please see new submission due date below

This is an updated call for papers for a special 2014 journal issue of MEDIANZ devoted to themes arising from the recent Surveillance, Copyright, Privacy Conference at Otago University. The issue will be guest edited by the conference organisers: John Farnsworth, Kevin Fisher and Erika Pearson. MEDIANZ is the new name for the reconstituted New Zealand Journal of Media Studies. It is an international peer-reviewed journal with a B ranking (ERA 2010). This promises to be a high-profile issue coinciding with the re-launch of the new website for the journal.

The orientation of the special issue mirrors that of the conference. We invite submissions focusing on both regional and international implications of surveillance, copyright, and privacy. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

·   Internet surveillance
·   the mobilization of the language of terrorism and the policing of the Internet
·   the Te Urewara raids
·   the three strikes law and the involvement of ISPs in policing users
·   the Kim Dotcom affair
·   the relationship between new technologies and shifting practices of surveillance
·   Digital divides and the left behind
·   The commodification of users
·   The attention economy
·   ICT’s and the grounding of the cloud
·   Subaltern subversion and dark webs
·   The new enclosures and the walled garden of web use
·   Wikileaks
and whistleblowing
·   Information bombs and disasters
·   Or any other issue tied to the broad conference themes

Submissions must be received by 12 July 2014. The journal is bi-annual and our special issue has been confirmed for Vol 2, 2014. Please direct enquiries, questions and submissions to Erika Pearson  or John Farnsworth .

Submission Guidelines

Articles should be approximately 4000-7000 words in .doc or .docx format. Shorter pieces (1500-2500 words) will be considered for position papers, provocations, or reviews of workshops. Submissions should conform to Chicago Author-Date referencing. Please refer to the online guide here: http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/16/ch15/ch15_toc.html:

Submit only in MS Word (doc, docx) format

  1. Headings and subheadings in bold font
  2. Submit any tables and images as separate attachments
  3. Submit images in the largest TIFF file size available
  4. Include an abstract of the paper and up to 6 keywords
  5. Omit any reference to authors in the text (anonymize the text)
  6. Include a separate file with author bio

We will also publish audio and video content on the site as part of the issue. If these need to be embedded in your text, please indicate the location for each item. Consult the editors if you have questions about formats, file size or presentation.

The Editors

Dr Kevin Fisher 
Dr John Farnsworth
Dr Erika Pearson

Updated call for papers and extended deadline for submissions

Saturday, March 22nd, 2014 | fiske24p | No Comments

Please find attached the revised CFP for the special journal issue of MEDIANZ: Media Studies Journal of Aotearoa New Zealand. Due to delays with the new journal website (which should be up in early April now) and the first issue for 2014 running behind schedule, we have postponed the due date for submissions until 12 July, 2014. The special issue will be Volume 2, 2014 and we expect it to be online by late November. The journal has also adopted the Chicago Author-Date Referencing style and link to the official style guide is included in the CFP below. Please feel free to contact us: <kevin.fisher@otago.ac.nz> or <erika.pearson@otago.ac.nz> with any questions.

SCP_CFP_updated

 

Call for Papers: Special Issue of MEDIANZ

Saturday, February 15th, 2014 | fiske24p | No Comments

MEDIANZ: International Journal of Media Studies, Aotearoa New Zealand

Surveillance, Copyright, Privacy: the end of the open Internet?

Call for Papers

We’re pleased to announce a special journal issue devoted to papers from the recent conference at Otago University, guest edited by the conference organisers: John Farnsworth, Kevin Fisher and Erika Pearson. MEDIANZ is the new name for the reconstituted New Zealand Journal of Media Studies. It is an international peer-reviewed journal with a B ranking (ERA 2010). This promises to be a high-profile issue coinciding with the re-launch of the new website for the journal. We will send out another announcement as soon as the new site is up and running—hopefully by the end of Feb. 2014.

The orientation of the special issue is the same as that of the conference. We invite submissions focusing on both regional and international implications of surveillance, copyright, and privacy. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

·   Internet surveillance

·   the mobilization of the language of terrorism and the policing of the Internet

·   the Te Urewara raids

·   the three strikes law and the involvement of ISPs in policing users

·   the Kim Dotcom affair

·   the relationship between new technologies and shifting practices of surveillance

·   Digital divides and the left behind

·   The commodification of users

·   The attention economy

·   ICT’s and the grounding of the cloud

·   Subaltern subversion and dark webs

·   The new enclosures and the walled garden of web use

·   Wikileaks
and whistleblowing

·   Information bombs and disasters

·   Or any other issue tied to the broad conference themes

A range of theoretical perspectives, articulations on the issues, and praxis/case studies are encouraged. Special attention will be given to submissions that challenge or critique existing thinking or practice on these issues.

Articles should be approximately 4000-7000 words in .doc or .docx format. Shorter pieces (1500-2500 words) will be considered for position papers, provocations, or reviews of workshops. A style guide will follow shortly. Submissions must be received by 31 March 2014. The journal is bi-annual and this special issue will have a 2014 release date. Please direct enquiries, questions and submissions to kevin.fisher@otago.ac.nz.

Conference Recap: Big Brother and Beyond

Monday, February 10th, 2014 | peaer75p | No Comments

John Farnsworth, an organiser of New Zealand’s first conference on internet surveillance at Otago University last week, reviews some of its conclusions

Like rust, online surveillance never sleeps. This was among the gloomiest themes to emerge from the first conference on internet surveillance held at Otago University last week. But the conference also revealed signs for hope, amidst widespread agreement about how many ordinary rights have been muted or removed by governments and big corporations. Some of these signs have arisen simply from public reaction to the extent of international snooping.

Three days of intensive discussion amongst 41 participants, swelled to a hundred for the four public keynote sessions. Each session, dotted throughout the conference, strung together surveillance, privacy and copyright issues. They saw hacktivists engaged with academics, policy analysts debating cryptographers, and former spies questioning legal experts.

The first of its kind, the conference threw into sharp relief the inequities and injustices that recent internet legislation has heaped on largely innocent users. New Zealand, as journalist Nicky Hager demonstrated, is as complicit as anywhere. This has been not just through the Search and Surveillance Bills passed last year, or the Bill now before parliament, but in its role as long-standing accomplice of the US Government through the Waihopa base and its part in the 5 Eyes international snooping arrangements. As Vikram Kumar, the former CEO of Mega, commented, more of New Zealand’s role will be revealed this year once further material from the Edward Snowden NSA tapes are released.

But if surveillance was one prominent theme so, too, was privacy. A significant issue often lost in public debate is the difference between privacy and anonymity. Vikram Kumar clarified this, describing how Mega, for example, internationally renowned for its encrypted cloud storage, is in the privacy not the anonymity business. The distinction he drew is that Mega will respond to reasonable requests to investigate illegal activity by site users who have violated privacy to gain anonymity.

The issue of privacy versus surveillance, and the place of citizen rights, percolated right through the conference. There was an impassioned defence of the rights of the individual to retain control over such data as personal health records, family secrets and the ordinary private affairs we all have. Professor Graham Murdock underlined the threats to privacy by pointing to the UK government’s recent announcement it will auction individuals’ health data to private companies.

Murdock also highlighted the dense entanglement of state and corporate interests. As he and many presenters emphasised, datamining lies at the heart of this issue: the gathering of Big Data and its use in predicting often invisible patterns of behaviour. athering Big Data allows predictive analytics to expose often invisible patterns of behaviour. Datamining compounds staggering amounts of digital traffic, literally trillions of items every day, sifting them through keywords and tags for markers of significance. But this ceaseless activity remains both largely ungoverned and highly obscure.

State and private agencies also use datamining for ‘fishing expeditions’.  Spy agencies trawl the digital sea of individuals’ private records, intruding on anyone who has committed no greater crime than accessing the internet, a laptop or phone. Nicky Hager emphasised that any single individual has little chance of interception, though Judge Harvey later raised important civil liberties implications. He reminded his audience that in earlier days phone tapping carried tough legal restrictions and penalties, a dramatic difference to the often open season now in place.

In the private sphere, as the conference learnt, Big Data allows corporations, from casinos to online video companies, to anticipate behaviour before consumers know it themselves. This allows patterns of spending and consumer behavior to be shaped without their awareness. For example, increasingly companies can predict when employees may quit their job, a privacy concern. Or airlines instantly change online prices, based on closely forecasting seat demand.

Labour MP Clare Curran highlighted the stark imbalances in public and private transparency in another way. She pinpointed the growing lack of protection against state or private intrusion, and the obscurity in which corporations and the state operate. To redress this, she proposed a new digital Bill of Rights, one with real teeth that will protect ordinary citizens.

Her workshop saw ideas that flourished elsewhere throughout the conference. There was the idea of creating a guaranteed right to internet access that ensured free online speech , or running the internet as a public utility, similar to water or electricity. Professor Murdock broached the possibility of a public service internet which, like public broadcasting, functions on behalf of the public good.

Similar debates circulated around copyright. Copyright often protects corporations better than the creators they are meant to represent, and lies at the heart of the online piracy wars. Copyright is also transformed in a digital environment where nearly anything is copied and an original work can have the half-life of a firefly. Because artists seek distribution, alternative notions of Copyleft and a Creative Commons have emerged, but with a trail of accompanying complexities, as conference panels debated.

Underlying all this was the question of an open internet. Can it continue? Nicky Hager  suggested it may continue to remain open, but it has never been secure. Other speakers reminded delegates there has never been just one internet. Others, such as Darknet, exist in parallel but may be inaccessible.

An open internet is also a mixture of code, content and agreed rules, and there was extensive debate how each of these contribute to its cohesion. Paradoxically, its openness also depends on secrecy: secure communication such as PGP cryptography enable legitimate free speech without state interference.

Yet conference discussion suggested the open internet may well crumble. Individual  states, some reacting to the Edward Snowden revelations, are seeking to limit and manage internet access as China, for example, has long done. There was also clear agreement the internet upheavals will continue.

This may come from new revelations from the Snowden papers about New Zealand snooping or reaction to the latest surveillance Bill before Parliament. As participants agreed, watch this space and the ongoing internet freedoms connected to it.

 

Selected Links

Images by delegates from the conference.

Posted papers and slides

Angela Daly: Ubiquitous Surveillance and the Right to Anonymity.

Mark McGuire: Copyright, Creative Commons and Libre Culture in New Zealand.

(if you would like to add your link, please email it to us!)

Thank you

Sunday, February 2nd, 2014 | peaer75p | No Comments

Thank you all for attending the conference and making it the success that it was.  The Call for the special issue of the journal related to the conference will be sent out shortly, and we will also soon be uploading audio of the keynote talks as well, so watch this space!

Thanks again
- the conference organizers

24 hrs to go

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014 | peaer75p | No Comments

Not long to go now!  The main conference is now completely full, and registrations have closed.  If you missed out, don’t worry – you’re still welcome to attend the keynote and plenary events in Castle 1.

Registration opens at 9.30am in Castle 1 (enter through doors opposite Library/ISB) and we can’t wait to see you there for what looks to be an incredible and very timely event.

Some FAQs

Monday, January 13th, 2014 | peaer75p | No Comments

Just to clarify and answer a few questions that have come in:

1) How long are the presentations?
Paper presentations in panels have each been allocated 30 min — 20 min for the paper and 10 min for discussion and questions — with three papers per panel.  Keynotes will be approximately 45-60 min with time for discussion and questions after.  Roundtables are 90 min, which will be plenty of time to really discuss some of the fascinating roundtable topics.

2) Where do I get tickets/register?  How much?
To attend the entire conference is NZ$100 (waged) or NZ$50 (student/unwaged).  The plenary panel and the talks by Nicky Hager, Graham Murdock and Vikram Kumar is now, thanks to our sponsors, free for the public — all welcome.  To purchase tickets/registration for full conference, please go here (link to CC gateway at the bottom).

3) I’m traveling to Dunedin for the first time.  Where can I find accomodation?
Dunedin is a university city, so there are several options.  Try TravelBug which can be searched by accomodation type, number of travelers, ect.  Another option is AirBNB if you’d like to stay with a local. Dunedin is a very walkable city, with the campus right in town.  Please be aware that the Masters Games and several other events are also happening at the end of January, so if you haven’t booked accomodation already, you might want to do so soon.

4) How do I get into town from the airport?
Dunedin International Airport is located some distance from the city.  Taxis (NZ$80-100 each way) and shuttle buses (approx NZ$25 per trip) both operate frequently between the airport and all major points in the city.  You do not need to prebook either service.  Taxis and the shuttle departure point can be found just outside the main doors on the ground level of the airport.

5) Where is registration? Castle 1? Library Conference Rooms?
On Thursday the 30th, registration and coffee will be set up in the foyer of the Castle 1 Lecture Theatre, where the opening plenary will be held.

(On google maps map-view, it’s the square numbered 75, corner of SH1 and Albany).  If you are driving, please be aware that SH1 is one-way at campus (Southbound) and there is metered street parking around campus, or unmetered street parking a few blocks south and east.  Parking on campus is by parking permit only.

Castle Lecture Theatre is in the pedestrian only area of campus.  The nearest street corner is SH1 and Albany Street.  The library, right next door, backs onto Albany Street, and is part of the Information Services Building, ISB, right in the heart of main campus.

The library and ISB as seen from the Library Lawn right next to Castle (to right of photo)

Panel sessions will be held in the conference suite inside the library, and guides will be on hand to show you up to the rooms on the first floor, near the main stairwell and elevators.

You can access different campus maps here.

Any more questions, please don’t hesitate to email us.  We look forward to welcoming you to Otago and the Surveillance, Privacy, Copyright conference.

Registration Reminder

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014 | peaer75p | No Comments

Thanks to all who have already registered.  If you are on the programme but have yet to register, can you please do so before Weds 22 January, otherwise we may need to remove you from the programme.  Details on registration and the credit card gateway can be found here.  We look forward to seeing all of you in Dunedin at the end of the month, and for those who have been asking  what to pack, you might find the Dunedin Metservice page handy.

 
 
Contact the Committee via erika.pearson@otago.ac.nz

Any views or opinion represented in this site belong solely to the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the University of Otago. Any view or opinion represented in the comments are personal and are those of the respective commentator/contributor to this site.